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  • Cricieth - Frederic Stanley Kipping FRS Scientist 1863-1949

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Criccieth - Frederic Stanley Kipping FRS Scientist 1863-1949 Professor Kipping was born in Higher Broughton in 1863. He studied chemistry in London and Germany and afterwards was appointed Assistant Professor at Herriot Watt College in Edinburgh. He undertook much of the early work into the development of silicon polymers at Nottingham University where he became he first professor of chemistry endowed by Sir Jesse Boot . He pioneered the study of the organic compounds of silicon and coined the term silicone. His research formed the basis for the worldwide development of the synthetic rubber and silicone-based lubricant industries. He retired in 1936, and he and his wife Lily together with a younger daughter moved to live at 11, Marine Terrace Criccieth. His grandson, Brian, was evacuated to Criccieth at the start of WW2 and also lived with them and attended the King’s School Worcester which was relocated to Criccieth at the oubreak of war. Two of the Kipping family were relocated to Criccieth during the war. He remembers that the family had an allotment near the station and kept chickens. Professor Kipping’s youngest daughter Esme made jig-saw puzzles and sold them or rented them out through the K.E.K Jig-Saw Puzzle Club. They are still remembered as there was no picture accompanying them and so were very difficult to complete. Today they are highly collectable.

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