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David Lloyd George and his family were subjected to many attacks for his opposition to the war. Margaret, his wife, was snubbed and insulted by both friends and strangers in London and Cricieth. Richard, his eldest son, had to leave his preparatory school on account of the bullying due to his father's stand on the war. Even effigies of his brother William and Uncle Lloyd were burned publicly on "Mafeking Night". The high tide of attacks was the riot at Birmingham in December 1901 when Lloyd George tried to address meeting opposed to the war. To the accompaniment of chants of "Traitor! Traitor! Bloody traitor! Pro-Boer! Kill 'im! Kill the bloody traitor!" the crowd rioted, he did not give his address and had to escape dressed as a policeman. The police had to break up the crowd. After the riot about forty people had to be treated in hospital.

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