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Annie Hughes Griffiths personal diary 1924 [transcription]

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‘Annie’s Diary’ – Transcription

A Personal Account of the Welsh Women’s Peace Petition to America of 1924, from the diary of Annie-Jane Hughes Griffiths, Chair of the Welsh League of Nations Union (WLNU)

 

Resources on the Welsh Women’s Peace Petition of 1923-24

https://www.wcia.org.uk/peace-heritage/womens-peace-petition/ 

 

Scanned Pages from Annie’s Diary in the National Library

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157680212085978

 

Finding Aid – National Library

https://archives.library.wales/index.php/annie-j-hughes-griffiths

 
 

Transcription Guidance for Users

 

  • Annie’s Diary has been transcribed by a team of volunteers working with WCIA, the Welsh Centre for International Affairs, successor to the WLNU of the 1920s. WCIA express our thanks to all volunteers for their support in making accessible this valuable resource from Wales’ Peace Heritage .

 

  • The diary has been formatted into ten sections, divided geographically by tour locations for ease of access. These sections are numbered and accessible via shortcuts in the outline to the left of the text. At the end is a ‘Notes’ section from the diary, a collection of miscellaneous figures and texts written out by Annie.

 

  • Page numbers are indicated by the transcriber in underlined blue text, hyperlinked to photographs of the corresponding diary pages on WCIA’s Flickr channel.

 

  • Dates are included in the original text at the beginning of most days. Where the date was clear but went un-indicated by Annie, they have been added in blue text.

 

  • Infrequent words and phrases appear highlighted in bright yellow throughout the transcribed text. These are words that were either too indistinguishable to transcribe at, in which case they appear as: ‘_’, or the words transcribed remain debated, in which case the word is in place but also highlighted.

 

  • Research done by the various contributing transcribers is displayed in the notes section to the right and can be added too if further information is known. The corresponding sections in the text are highlighted in a light peach. Underlined blue text  within the body of the diary denotes the hyperlinking of certain names and entities to websites related to them.

1. Setting Sail for America

Page 3

Feb 2nd 1924 

A beautiful bright morning, sun shining. Had a light breakfast, and at 9.10am the taxi ordered overnight arrived. After depositing my trunk, suit case & hold all within, Peter, Mary & I got in & drove comfortably to Euston Station. Arrived there at 9.35 and found our train already on Platform 14.

 

A Saloon Carriage had been reserved for us through the extreme kindness of Mr Glynne Roberts of Euston Station, & this was no ordinary saloon, but a Drawing Room with comfortable easy chairs, table etc. The baggage was deposited inside, & very soon friends began to arrive. Among those were: Ms Mary Davies & Mr Arthur Davies; Mr & Mrs Hopkyn Morris MP; Mr Goronwy Owen MP; Rev James Nicholas; Mr Selwyn Davies; Mr Phillips; Mr John Davies Judd Snr; Mr __ Jenkins _; Mrs Eugan Evans David - Mrs _ _; Mrs _ Hughes & _; __; Mrs Humphrey Williams; Miss Rowlans; Mrs Clement - Davies; Mrs Howell Idris Bennest; Miss Mary Jenkins (gwalia); _ Harri Williams

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Mrs. Hannah Williams, Mr Wilfred Rowland, Mr. Jones, Mr. Glynn Evans from Kings Cross, several Clapham Junction people - Mr. Lloyd Williams Harley St.; Mrs. John Rowlands & Mrs Glynne Roberts who had come to see Miss Carver off. Rev. Gwilym Davies; Miss Mag Roberts; Miss Davies H_ and many others. 

About 1015 Mr. Nicholas Castle St. called upon Mrs. Hopkin Norris to present me with a beautiful bouquet of purple iris tulips, anemones & violets - tied with beautiful shop silk ribbon from which was the following inscription.

*several blank lines (no inscription)*

Reporters were busy taking own notes - several photos were taken by the P.A Mrs Morris this she did with a kind expression of good wishes for the delegation.

Then Mrs. Boyd Robson presented me with a beautiful bouquet of yellow daffodils tied with yellow shot green ribbon with the following inscription -

*several blank lines (no inscription)*

Mr. Goronwy Owen then spoke a few words, emphasising the “Gesture” which was being anticipated between Wales & America - & wishing us Godspeed.

I said a few words in reply and tried to thank them adequately and fittingly. We then got aboard the train. Mrs Carver, Rev. Gwilym Davis & myself. I said a big good-bye to all- & kissing of Mary Davis & Peter only.

We soon steamed out of the station loaded with good wishes. I forgot to say that the members of my S.S. class had give me a most glorious basket of choice fruit - presented by Mrs. Rowlands Barrier st.

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accompanied with a card with this inscription

*two blank lines (no inscription)*

This to me was a delightful surprise, & greatly appreciated as a proof of personal devotion and affection. Mrs. Gwilym Davies, Miss Carver & myself had lunch at 12:30, & we reached lime street at 2:30 p.m. Here we were met by Miss Anna Rowlands & Miss Menai Rowlands and we took a taxi and drove down to the Prince’s landing stage.

Here we got on the boat, the SS Cedric,  & a representative of the White Star Line Co. made himself known to me, & told me that the oak case containing the 390296 signatures was safely in the hold. I soon found Mrs. Melhuish Thomas who was coming out for the trip and Elined Prys who was one of the non-official deputation.  Miss Prys & Mrs. Davies & myself were photographed several times. Saw Mr. And Mrs. Lloyd Phillips and the editor of  "the Brython" and his daughter on board - also Mrs. John Edwards. As I was coming app the companion way with the lovely bouquets in my hands a lady exclaimed "oh she must have made a mistake - she must be a first class passenger with those glorious flowers."

Leila Megane and her fiance Osborne Roberts are also going on this boat - she goes 1st class, he 2nd class . The line between 1st & 2nd is severely observed on the boat.

All our friends, our goodbye friends,  had to leave the boat about 3:15 and we left soon after 3:30 p.m. It was a dull day, but not wet. We steamed down the river & soon had tea. I found at the Purser's office about 15 telegrams, & just as many letters wishing me luck - from the following:

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*half blank page (no names listed)*

Afterwards Mrs Thomas & I, who shared cabin 152, unpacked our things, some of them at any rate, & then we went to the state Room & wrote letters. Then dinner came at 7:00 p.m. Mrs. Thomas, Miss Carver Elined Prys & I had table No: 5 and we enjoyed a good meal.  We sat on afterwards in the Dining Room which is also the Recreation Room

We turned into a bunks about 9:45. I have the top bunk, & as we have a port-hole we have plenty of air. Had a good night, woke & slept  all through from 10:00 p.m. until nearly 8:00 a.m. next morning.

 

Feb 3rd Sunday

Got to Queenstown by 8:00 a.m. Several passengers came on board & there was no morning service on that account. We hired our deck chairs for the voyage - paying 6/6 each for their hire -  Spent the morning reading, talking - started reading St Matthew's gospel. Broke biscuits at 11:00 a.m. - had breakfast in bed - got up and was on deck at 9:00 a.m. Walked round & round 1st & 2nd class quarters, had a lot in early telegram from Peter. Then lunch at 1 and then out on deck again. A dull sunless day but quite fresh.  The coast of Ireland is disappearing from sight as I write -  The gulls following us with their ‘cruk’ ‘cruk’ cruk’ are impatient.

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crowd of birds - wanting something undoubtedly, but as their language is unknown to me - we cannot supply their needs.  So far a very happy and pleasant trip. Spoke to a miss Marjorie Lindsay, assistant to professor OT Jones at Owens college who is going out to Detroit as a "Frances Riggs" scholar to study USA Geology for one year. She knows Olive Wheeler and knew of Mary Williams & like O T Jones,  had come to Manchester station to see her off on her departure. She goes for one year - she has linked herself to our foursome -

 

3:15 pm, February 3rd 1924 

Had tea and tried to sit down to dinner but failed to do so retired to cabin and to bed - had lemon water & fruit. Clock put back 1 1/2 hours. A bit of a swell & not very pleasant.

 

Monday February 4th 

Stayed in bed for breakfast - had a nice warm bath. Then on deck for a walk & then to cabin & slept until 1.30. Had lunch. Mr. Rowlands of Portland, first class passenger, called see me. He is from Aberdovey originally, took Duellgu for  some months last year. Going with his wife to St Kaus Hot Springs to see if they will cure her. She has sleeping sickness.

Rested in afternoon & on deck had tea & dinner, & out on deck again saw leila megane and sat on her deck with her, to bed early at 8:30 p.m.. Had a poor night, slept only until 2:00 a.m. Clock put back 38 minutes more - sea beautifully smooth.

 

Tuesday Feb. 5th

See less calm, had a bad day, did very little, managed to get on deck but spent most of the

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day lying down.

 

Wednesday Feb. 6 

Took no meals in saloon. Spent most of the day-in the cabin. Felt sick & seedy & did not go on deck at all. Heavy rolling of boat.

 

Thursday Feb. 7th 

much the same. Took no meals in saloon & just sat about & slept & read novels. Had very little zest for anything. Sea still rough.

 

Friday. Feb: 8th

Much better day - sea fairly calm. Went on deck. Very cold-but fine. Walked up rooms & went to have tea with Mrs Edwards in 1st class. Called to see Leila Megane & found her in bed with cold ship’s rum.

 

Saturday. Feb: 9th

Better day. Sea calm. Had meals in dining room again & was out of doors quite a lot. Read novels and just-lazed. Spent afternoon & evening writing letters. Ship’s rum.

 

2. New York

 

Sunday Feb 10th

Had service in 1st class saloon. Leila Megane sand ‘O Fryniau Caersalem’ as a solo, & a few of us sang it over again as a chorus. After the service was over, a gentleman came & asked us if we were a Welsh choir on tour in the States - very very tickled at this as our singing was truly atrocious. Went & had orange juice & grape fruit at Mr. John Edwards’. He gave me ‘Enchanted April’ as a gift. Spent evening writing to Peter & others.

Ship’s rum.

“It gets me giddy”

Page 9 

Monday, Feb 11th

Called at 7 a.m. for breakfast at 7.30. Had reached the end of our journey. Went on deck after breakfast. I saw land and different boats anchored nearby. Passed by quarantine doctor. Saw Statue of Liberty glowing in the sunlight. Bitterly cold wind, bright sunshine. Waited about until 12 – had hurried lunch. When at lunch a press man came to me and said ‘Mrs Griffiths, I am from the press. I have something to say, I said. Oh! Said he – we know your story of the Women of Wales Movement – but we want only for photos – will you come to the top deck when you have finished. Agreed said I. So Elined & I trotted up to the top deck 1st class – where we found four burly photographers awaiting us.

************************************************************************

Separated by a line from the rest of the text:

The Cedric took ten boats to push her up the river thro’ the ice’

*************************************************************************

There we were photographed quite twenty times – in different positions & back again to 2nd class to await the coming of the Immigration Officers. They came about 2 – before this we had gone on Deck & had seen Marg Ellis, Mrs Tuttle, Miss Belle Baunch & other American ladies who had come down to meet the deputation in the Customs Shed awaiting us. Eventually they got on board and there was much hand shaking & welcoming us. The ladies all wore daffodils –I had had the daffodil bouquet put in cold storage when I got on the Cedric & it was beautifully fresh for my arrival in New York. So I carried it in my hand & wore my best costume & hat to greet the American ladies.

We got through the Customs easily due to the kindness of Mrs Fairman(a friend of Mrs Glynne Roberts) & a Mrs Moyse, a

 

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friend of Mrs Thomas’ cousin’s husband - then we had the luggage put in a tram - the oak chest with the memorial forms given over _ness delivery - & we came up to the women’s university club in Mrs Laidlaw’s car which was decorated with daffodils. 

When we got here we were told our engagements - as made by Mary Ellis.

On the way up I gave Mary letters from various friends including one from her chief woman inspector Miss Walk prohibiting her as an H.N.I from taking part in the move - went sc sc sc.

Poor Mary was very upset at this. So were we all - it cast quite a gloom over the party. She has done such splendid spade work- no-one can ever estimate the value of her preliminary arrangements. 

 

She has _ all round & has brought together so many strands & they have formed into one strong force of women to work for Peace -

We were due at 4.30 at Mrs Berney Baruch’s house- whose husband was President Wilson’s right hand man at Versailles. They live in a perfectly wonderful house - luxuriously furnished with exotics lavishly decorating the rooms - A large crowd of people had been united to meet ‘Welsh Delegation’ - we were presented to one after another. Met Miss Ruth Morgan a charming- good-looking - very attractive woman - and Mrs Jones, Brooklyn relative of Mary Ellis. Mrs Roosevelt - 

Mrs *space left for unknown name* of Radio activity - Mrs Bugbee of the New York _, Mrs Laidlaw & many more- also a Gentleman of the Press

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to whom I spoke freely and gave information as he desired.

A most delicious tea. Choice sandwiches & most delectable cakes “the best in New York” was a pistachio cake so Mrs Baruch told me.

We walked back here, then had dinner, Mary, Mrs Thomas & I – Elined having gone to see a friend. After dinner we went to the Ambassador’s Hotel - as Mary wanted to cable to Miss Walk & I sent a cable to David. Back here & to bed. A very remarkable day. Rather a blizzard when we got to New York, but better weather towards evening.

The Club is very comfortable, but very warm. Still one gets used to the warm atmosphere & dresses accordingly.

My impressions of the American women I have met today is that they are genuine & sincere in their efforts to give the Movement all the support they can. Their reception of us was so spontaneous so natural & without any of the side & affectation of English women. They accepted us at our highest value, as Ambassadors of Peace. They did not quiz & criticise us first & gradually thaw.

 

Tuesday, Feb 12th

Got up fairly early & had a light breakfast; grapefruit & tea & toast, wrote a few letters, and went out to get medicine for Mary Ellis who was not well. Rev. D. M. Richards called and was exceedingly kind.

Mrs Laidlaw called for us at 12.30 to take us to the luncheon of the Historical Round Table of the Town Hall. This Round Table has been arranged to bring together those people who are interested in the Romance of the Founding & Growth of the City. We had a delightful lunch. I sat between Mrs Carr &  Van Auda & a Mrs Prizotto, a Spanish or Portuguese Artist 

 

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There were many very interesting people present. Henry Taft - Ex Pres: Taft’s brother

Miss Theodore Douglas Robinson,sister of Ex Pres: Roosevelt and a prominent Republican leader, who read “oh captain, my captain”; Miss Elizabeth Marbury, a playwright (a 2ndMrs J M Jenkins) of the Democratic Party Women’s Chairman; Mr Geo Haven Putman whose father was a great friend of Abe Lincoln. He gave his recollections of Lincoln’s first visit to New York. & read an extract from the first speech Lincoln made in New York. Neither let us be frightened from our duty for right makes might, and let us do our own duty as we understand it. Lincoln, Prof Barnoum, Professor at Columbia University “Little merit to be born”, great merit to give birth”.

“Leave foot-prints on the lands of time, but no finger-prints for the policemen”.

 

Other speeches on Dutch citizens of New York. After luncheon was over, talked to many people, & were invited to another luncheon on Friday in the same place. A compliment to Dr Damrosche.  After being shown over the town hall and audit atrium, a beautiful room, Mrs Laidlaw drove us back here in her car. We found M. Ellis better but not fit to accompany us to tea.

 

Mrs Laidlaw called later & took us in her car to Mrs Passous who lives in a beautiful apartment in 1155 Park Avenue.Gorgeous place and hostess attired in full evening dress, a beautiful woman, in shimmering mauve and diamante. 

 

Met a Miss Halfood who knows Russian inside out and who had translated the Church Service into that language. And this day her

 

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translation had been used in a Church in N.Y. for the first time. A very critical caustic & rather terrifying woman.

Then a long dissertation on Pitcairns Bible by Mr Laures, Mrs Parson’s father. Remarkable story of one of the Tahitian islands being governed by the Bible & all that was done by the people was done thro [sic.] the guidance of the teaching of this Bible.

Elined, Mrs Thomas & I walked back all the way to the Club. Had dinner at Club. Elined left & went to stay with friends. And Mary, Mrs Thomas and I stayed on.

 

Wednesday, Feb 13th 

Went out shopping with Mrs Thomas. She bought watch. Called at Biltmore hotel & saw Mrs Moyse, arranged about oak chest: to be sent there in time for Tuesday’s luncheon – also arranged to return on “Olympic” on March 22nd to Southampton. Walked up Fifth Avenue & admired array of beautiful things in shop windows.

Got on a bus and had a 10 cents ride along Riverside, on this beautiful sunny morning. Ground white with newly-fallen snow, river Hudson a sheet of ice, with one little motor boat flying about.

Then to Horace Mann School & Training College - met Mary Elias outside. Heard a lesson on Appreciation of Music, to tiny tots of 6, 7 & 8. “To a Wild Rose” piece written by Ed McDowell – then looked thro’ various rooms saw children’s work. Then to the Cafetarea [sic] – helped ourselves to everything. Just took an aluminium tray, paper d’oyley spoons forks etc – chose food & proceeded to a side table & had an excellent meal – from there we went over Colombia Library. Wonderful 

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building with dome of green & a huge white ball suspended as if in space.

Got on train & then had taxi & went to Mrs Croley’s to tea. She had gone to the poorer end of town (wife of Editor of New Republic) & had transformed old house into most delightful modern dwelling. Mr Croley, Ed of New Republic met among other interesting people, a Miss Mercer, a great & intimate friend of Mrs Russell Cooke. She was in the States on a lecturing tour & was going on to Washington to speak on Personalities & Politics. Very pretty house, decorated & planned by a Mrs Green whom we met at the house. 

Came home in Mrs Laidlaw’s car. Had dinner & walked to Waldorf Astoria. Saw Mr Roberts & Megane, they seemed miserable & wanted to leave their hotel - we walked back & went into the Ambassadors Hotel & talked over the D.W.S. Headship vacancy. Mary finally deciding not to apply. Back to club to bed.

 

Thursday, Feb 14th

Sat in library and wrote letters all morning. Made a fair copy of my speech for Tuesday’s luncheon. I had a letter from Peter, telling me that “the house is quiet & lonely without you.” Mary Ellis had a wire from Miss Walk re: Washington, telling her she could go, se se -

We three went to lunch to the Elm Tree – no go – very uninviting – thence to Cook’s to change money & on to Fifth Avenue to Consolidated Ticket Office. Got information re trip to West. Then we went to Women’s Citizen office & saw Miss Roderick & had a long talk with her about Memorial. From there to English Speaking Union Club where we met many

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of our new friends & had a most hospitable reception. Mr Mrs  John Daniels host & hostess. I met Mr Kennedy brother of Woodbine Willy. Mr K is Editor of International Bulletin & arranged to call and see him at his office re an article for his paper. Said a few words re our visit met much kindness from all friends.

Left with Mrs Laidlaw in her car & Mrs Neal & her daughter Mrs Bower, & went to a Restaurant in Park Avenue (Chierry’s) as Mrs Neal’s guests. We three Mary, Mrs Thomas & myself had a delicious beef steak dinner, beautifully cooked. Went in taxi with Mrs Neal & left her at her home & then came back here & wrote letters in Library – to Mrs Rathbone, Menai Rowlands & Tom.

 

Friday, Feb 15th

Got ready early to go out, but held up by photographer who came from Underwood & Underwood. took photos of Mary Ellis and me together & singly. M. E. then left for the weekend to the Bigelows.

Mrs Thomas & I went to Ambassadors Hotel & had our hairs shampooed (From there to Maddison Avenue where Mrs Thomas bought hat). Looked at shops & hurried back to Club & found Mrs Laidlaw had phoned telling us to come to the Town Hall in taxi – arrived there rather late – but were put to sit at table with the Misses Damrosch & a lady with pearls like hazel nuts & a gentleman. This was a round table luncheon to Dr Damrosch, an act of appreciation Mr Gly in the chair. Several speakers took part, & I was 

 

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asked to speak - about my mission - I mentioned the link between Wales and music & Dr Damrosch - the story of Theo Roosevelt and Rev: D Richards about the perfect marriage between ‘O Fryniau Caersalem’ and the tune ‘Ola Derby’ asked for a perfect union bet: Wales and America for world peace will we produce a symphony 2nd to none. Composed by only living musicians.

From there we went to the ‘Ethical Culture Society’ with Mrs Laidlaw who was one of the speakers. Anna Garlin Spencer was in the chair.

Mrs Laidlaw spoke with great verve and directness, urging the women to bombard their senators with letters on the peace question & asked them to vote on the Bok adjudication. Then I was asked to speak without any warning - spoke of what had been done in Wales & asked them to do what they could in America for peace.

Came back from there in Mrs Laidlaw’s car and went to a club meeting, an address on Russia rather dull. Had tea & Mrs William Hughes called to see us with Mr Hughes - very genial and pleasant - went to see Mr Hughes in the car - promised to go there to dinner on Sunday.

At 6.40 went with Elined to Mrs Laidlaw’s house - had a delicious dinner - fruit - turkey - salad - rice pudding coffee - a young Russian there, & her daughter Louise & Mr Laidlaw.

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Drove to the Carnegie Hall to a concert. Symphony concert. Instrumental music only

And then Lowe - a very sociable evening.

 

Saturday Feb 16th

Wrote letters, long letter to Mrs Gwilym Davies. I went to Ambassadors’ Hotel & sent cable to Mrs Huw Pritchard & to Washington re our visit there. Went out & Mrs T bought hat in Madison Avenue then went to Fifth Avenue & discovered “the red dress” for Mrs Thomas - from there we taxied to the Colony Club in 5th Avenue & found Miss Ruth Morgan there. She took us over to Club, showing us entertaining rooms, turkish baths, gymnasium baths etc & gave us access to the whole club as members for a fortnight. Had a very interesting talk with her over our new reception in Washington & thence in taxi to Hotel Astor - where we went as her guests to Foreign Alliance Assoc Luncheon - at 12.45 - Mrs Level made winner of ‘Peace Bok Prize’ chief guest. Sat on-left of Mr Macdonald chairman & had very interesting talk with Mrs Kirsty Page - have table place & Mr Levermore’s signature very interesting discussion - Mr Levermore, Mr _ & Mrs Kirsty Page taking part.

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Sunday Feb 17th

Went in morning to hear Rev. H.E. Fosdick preach – Eccles: 9.2 Rom: 8.28. Author of Eccles full of cynicism; full of pessimism, God afar off. Nature unknown, immortality an idle dream. All comes alike to all. Paul dealing with same fact but Christ has come basic ‘experience’ of eternal life. how like but how different the result. The sinner – the Saint.

It is not what life brings to us in her hand but what we bring to life with our spirit. That makes which of these two roads are we taking. Experience work_ hope “Does it do that today?”

Paul’s experience was so varied. Still he said “all things work together for good”. Learn secret of Paul’s life: Elements that sutured into Paul’s conviction –

1) The impartiality of Nature cannot trace  . . . to  . . . .

2) All things do not come alike to all – Does death come alike to all?

Mount Vernon. Washington’s House – “let me die the death of the righteous”. Clean trouble. We are not to blame for trouble complicated by sin – unclean trouble. Woodrow Wilson’s death – respected by all memory of righteous is blessed – see son of God.

After service Mr W. M. Hughes met us in his car & drove us towards his home at 945 West End Avenue New York, but on the way the car broke down so we proceeded by taxi.

When we got there we found Mrs Hughes gracious and smiling & we had a most delicious dinner grapefruit, grilled chicken lovely potatoes, peas, onions & pineapple & apple tart & tea – too stiff to move after it. Had an interesting talk with Mrs Hughes, who mapped our itinerary to San Francisco & back which in fact helped us largely later.

Then in a taxi to Rev D M Richards’s house for tea- had tea there & went to evening service at Welsh chapel. A Mr Rees of 

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Scranton preached. Then in time after meeting, I said a few words. Back with Mrs Hughes, Mrs Alison to Mrs Hughes’s for supper thence to club driving in Mr. Mrs Alison’s taxi to the door.

 

Monday Feb 18th

 Went to Fifth Avenue & did some shopping, then to see Mr Blackwell & had some talk with him - then to see Mr. Fairman of the London Scottish Midland Railway who most kindly undertook to get our tickets for the grand tour to California & back - & we were able to say exactly what we wanted to do. Had lunch at Fifth Avenue Rest. then tried to find Mr Kennedy whom I had promised to see about International Bulletin - failed to find him had wrong address.

Back to club. found Mary had returned - Miss Barruck rang up had to go down to office of League of Women Voters to read over speech for Radio live.

Back had tea, then had dinner with Mrs Mcculloch, a friend of Mrs Garneti - greatly enjoyed the evening.

 

Tuesday Feb 19th

Telephoning & much excitement. To Bank to get money for tickets - Changed £80 into dollars. Paid 269.54 dollars for round trip to California & back including sleepers. Then back to hotel got dressed for the Luncheon which was timed to begin at 1pm at Biltmore Hotel. Rather nervous about my speech. Got there in fair time in Mrs Laidlaw’s car & met many people. Was photographed with the other three & Mrs Laidlaw, Mrs Ruth Morgan & Mrs Tuttle  by the chest in the reception room. Went into the Dining Hall - The Cascade - & sat on Miss Ruth Morgan’s right-hand at the guest table.

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After the luncheon we had speeches. Mrs Ruth Morgan introduced the delegation - & I them gave an address on the links that bind Wales & America together, & our act of memorial. It seemed to be appreciated. Then we three went up to the chest which had been placed on a dais & padlocks were unlocked, & we gave up the padlocks & the memorial to Mrs Ruth Morgan. Then the chest was inspected and the first question I was asked concerning it was “Oes yma enwau o Sir Feirionydd” –Miss Sue Harvard sang Gwlad y Delyn & Hen Wlad fy Nhadau & thus ended one chapter in the history of the Memorial. It was a truly thrilling gathering and one which in our wildest flights of imagination, we had never thought of on such a comprehensive scale.

 

*Two empty pages - possibly press clipping fallen out?*

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Went along to 200 Fifth Avenue to see Mr Fairman to pay for our tickets, then back to Club in a taxi. Had tea there, & a talk with 2 German ladies who were great pacifists.

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That evening Miss Baruch called for me at the Club in her car, & she and M.E. & I went as far as a Hall & I broadcasted my address. They stayed in an adjoining room & said I did it well.

Back to the Club had dinner & packed in readiness for our departure on the morrow.

 

Wednesday Feb 20th

Just on 8am Mr Fairman rang me up, said as it was such a blizzard he will bring the tickets up to the Club instead of our going down to fetch them. As he was so kind we finished breakfast & packing and waited for him. He came about 10 & advised us to go along at once in the taxi he had come up in. This we did & got down to the Penn Rail Road at 11 a.m. We left our trunks at the Club until our return. He did everything possible for us for our comfort – getting us papers, giving us coffee & establishing the “uncle ship privilege” with Mary & Gladys & a brotherhood system with Annie. Introduced a Mr Gordon to us Supt of some Dept on the railway. Got on the 12.10 train for Washington – had lunch on the train – passed thro’ Baltimore, Philadelphia & other places. An un-interesting journey. Except for the two rivers that we crossed, houses all detached & wide acres of barren flat country partly covered by snow. Had a comfortable journey.

 

3. Washington

 

Met at Washington station by Mrs Eastman & her car - & drove to the American Assoc: of University Women’s Club. 1634 Eye Street N. W. where rooms had been reserved for us. Mrs T & I had adjoining rooms with bathroom between. Arrived here about 6 – had to get dressed immediately for the

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dinner which was given in our honour at the club.

Dinner at 7.p.m. - about 100 guests present. Mr Raymond Morgan in the chair - a most efficient chairman.

After dinner speeches . ‘Three wise women from the East’ & my address given in New York. Mary lead memorial and Elined gave a short address.

Much appreciation given to what we had done & said & many arrangements for our entertainment on the morrow. Boxed memorial handed to Mrs Morgan for all time. Met several BWIA women who were very cordial & effusive. Also Mr Kenny Barrett Learmed 2123 Bancroft Place Washington D.C. a friend of Prof. Webster - who invited me to dinner at his house the next evening. He had in his pocket a letter from Prof Webster with a sentence about me & my tact & manner. Went to bedroom, and copied out article written for South WalesDaily News - had good night’s sleep.

 

Thursday Feb 21st

Had breakfast together, grape fruit, wheat cakes, syrup & tea. At 10.a.m. Mrs Stowell came around to fetch us to show us the sights of Washington. Took a taxi and went passed Red Cross Buildings! Got out at Pan-American building a beautiful pile -

From there passed White House & Library of Congress- wonderful marble pillars of Baltimore marble brought there and put up by a Welshman , David Evans of Baltimore.

Went to find Mr. David Roberts - the librarian in the Fine Art section (Dafydd Bach) - his Eistedfodic (s.c) name - he showed us round & showed us many treasures - The Copy of Declaration of Independence,

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Lincoln’s great speech in his own handwriting, portraits of the senators, the book stacks, which have 210 miles of shelving, the arrangements for sending the books to the readers etc. A most magnificent building. From there we drove to the office of the League of Women Voters, where we were photographed. Then in charge of Mrs Morgan & Mrs Swiggelt we all walked across to White House for an interview with President Coolidge. On entering we found the hall filled with people, reporters, photographers & others. We saw a man in charge – in plain clothes –no uniform here . . .We saw on his list of President’s Engagements for the day Feb 21st 1924: 12.15 – Mrs Hughes-Griffiths, Miss Mary Ellis and Miss Pryce – we were shown into another room & waited there awhile with several other people, while the President’s secretary came out. Mr Stearns by name.

He opened the door leading into the room where Mr Coolidge stood standing, awaiting our arrival - & we were introduced to him by Mrs Morgan.

He said words to this effect “ You are from Wales”.

I: Yes

He: I have two Welshmen in my cabinet - Mr Hughes & Mr Davies.

I: Yes

He: And I have Welsh blood in my veins, having for an ancestor Nathaniel Davies. So you can’t get away from home.

I: We are proud to own you as a kinsman.

He: Thank you, I am very glad to see you.

I: Producing the copy of the Memorial & showing it to him together with photograph of oak chest. “This is the copy 

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of the memorial we have brought over from Women of Wales to W. of Am & the chest containing the signatures etc – We hope you will allow the chest to be placed in the Smithsonian Institute for all time –

He: I will do what I can to help you. I do not see what reason there is for it not to be placed there  - I was Vice President of the Institute etc etc.

 

We then left the room, after being cordially pleasantly welcomed by the President, a quiet dignified man of middle height. Straight nose, a pleasant manner and voice with a blue crease in his trousers. We went outside the White House & were besieged by an army of photographers – 9 in all. Were taken many many times. Shots have reached us this evening which are exceedingly good. From there we went back to the club – Had lunch with Mrs Morgan, Miss Sebane & Miss Eastman.

Then at 2pm we called round to see Mr Secretary Hughes. He came out of his room to see & welcome us – ‘smug’ is the word to describe him – he was pleasant but condescending & had very little to say to us. From there we went back to League of Women’s Voters’ rooms & then Mrs Abrahams took us in a taxi to the House of Representatives and the Senate House. We sat in both places for a short while & heard debates in both places in the former on a Corporation bill, in the latter on some Agricultural condition in a particular state. After this we had tea & then Mr Stowell came for us in his car & we were driven round and up to the Washington memorial – a huge tower straight and erect. 

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begun in 1848 & completed in 1884. Stones from all countries of the world are to be found in it.

Thence to the Lincoln Memorial a most beautiful marble temple with a huge statue of Lincoln seated inside by a sculptor by the name of French. The architect, Bacon (?) died last Sunday. This cost about 12,000,000 dollars paid by Congress.

Then we drove into the city round the zoological gardens & back past Mr Woodrow Wilson’s house to the club – the others went out to Mr and Mrs Stowell’s for dinner. I came in to dress, as I was going to Mr Learmed’s for dinner. He soon came to fetch me in his car & we called for Mrs Bermand , I found Mr and Mrs Percy Mackaye staying here. Had a very nice dinner & talked of the Websters, of the trip to San Francisco & many other things.

Had note from Peter McKaye for Theatre in San Francisco. Drove back to Club with Mrs Bermand – a very charming woman.

 

Friday Feb 21st 1924

Mrs Eastman arrived at 9 a.m. in her car, & we started for Arlington, a place about 4 miles from Washington, where sleep the silent hosts who died in the war for the Union.

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Then we drove back past the Lincoln Memorial where Elined took some photos. From here we went to the Photographers who took our photos outside White House. I ordered some large ones & post cards. Thence to Washington Cathedral where we saw Woodrow Wilson’s tomb with the simple inscription

Woodrow Wilson

1856-1924

A beautiful building in process of building – the money to be procured before continuing to build. From there back to Club lunch – where we were entertained by the alumni of Radcliffe College, the female part of Harvard University. Made a short speech after lunch. Mrs Doyle presided.

From there went to Miss Croft’s (Miss  Kerr’s assistant). Car to Smithsonian Institute where we decided!! on a spot where the oak chest should be placed. Had very jolly drive – back to Club. Thence to Mr. & Mrs. La Follette’s – a Senator likely to be new President & lead new party a very nice couple. Geo. Washington Day – cherry favour – large crowd Senators’ ladies standing in a row receiving. He said the best part of this house was the great sympathy with Peace movement – we are all interested in it but we have different ways of setting about it.

Very kind to us. Both of them whitehaired old couple very charming in manner. Went to station with M. Ellis & Elined. Saw them off. Walked to Club, bought oranges & went to Geo. Washington meeting in Memorial Hall.

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George Washington anniversary meeting

 

Saturday Feb. 22. 1924

Black lady on train. Manicurist. “You come from London? You speak very good English”.

Paper bags for hats – packed our things. Mrs. Morgan came to bid us goodbye, her last message being as follows –

“Our organisation, the National Council for Prevention of War, is trying to do one definite thing & is arranging an active Campaign to attempt to secure the sanction of the Senate for entrance into the Permanent Court of International Justice. Your visit to us has awakened a great deal of fresh interest, & will help our campaign forward greatly, for the success of such a campaign depends entirely upon popular interest, & your message to us has added that touch of drama which is necessary to arouse that interest.”

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Sunday - 9.a.m. Feb. 24th

Washington is very different from New York - in atmosphere and outlook - it is the political centre - & has none of the commercial & business aroma that one smelt round every corner in New York.


 

4. Chicago

 

We left Washington the White City at 11.45, & journeyed towards Chicago, in our section. At Harrisburg we removed to a compartment in paying 3.50 dollars each extra. We had a comfortable journey via Pittsburgh, where Mrs Mina Kerr got on the train. We had a nice talk together - she being on her way to attend a Conference of Deans of Women's Colleges which was nearby in Chicago Feb. 25-29th, at the Blackstone Hotel. At Englewood Station Chicago David met us, in a motor car. We apologized to David for bringing him out so early - why he said you [could] have come 5 hours earlier on such an occasion if necessary. Drove to 4933 Dorchester Avenue where Abbie gave us a great welcome, a beautiful breakfast being ready for us. Spotless linen. Fruit, sausages, buttered toast, & most delicious tea etc.

 

After breakfast & a wash, we had a nice talk, & in the afternoon David took us over the Museum - a splendid pile of buildings - visited many sections of it, & went on to the University Club to dinner - huge slices of beef. Home in motor car - & to bed – dead tired – had letters & news papers.

 

Monday Feb 25th

Had good night. David left at 8.45, as is his custom for the Museum. Abbie, Mrs. T. & I went to Marshall Field's to meet Lois Poole at 12.30 for lunch. A tremendous conglomeration of food - but we enjoyed it - & then Abbie went home, and Lois, Mrs. Thomas 

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and I went to the Ten Commandments Picture Show - then Mrs T. & I went back to 4933, & David came in and we had dinner at 7.p.m. at home. Mr. Rees the Druid called for an interview & information re. our visit - which I gave him.

 

Tuesday Feb 26th

David left as usual. Wrote letters galore. To lunch at University Club as guests of Mrs. Poole - Abbie's sister in law. Lois also there. Most elaborate luncheon, which I enjoyed. We three drove home in Mrs. Poole's car, & I went straight to bed, as I was not feeling very well. Slept for 2 hours, awoke refreshed. Got dressed for dinner at Blackstone Hotel, to which Mrs. Thomas & I had been invited to meet the Deans of Women's Colleges by Mrs. Kerr. Got there in a car ordered by David & arrived in good time. Got to the 2nd floor where the guests, about 400 women were assembled - & got into the most awful Babel of voices it has ever been my lot to hear.

 

Was introduced to several ladies but never caught the name of one as the noise was so great. Neither did Mrs. Thomas. Abbie had got a bouquet of lovely sweetpeas each for Mrs. T & me -  & we looked so swish. Went into the Ballroom for dinner - sat on Miss Root's, the President's right hand, & on Miss Kerr's left. One gentleman present, Prof. Merriam of Chicago University. A Dr. Wells, a woman of great distinction & President of the Assoc. of Women Deans, gave her report; then Frau Schreibe gave an account of the need for brotherhood, being

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one of 35 members of the Reichstag 15 of which were school teachers. Then I was called upon to speak of the Memorial, did so for 15 minutes, being time allotted. Met Miss Hurlbate of Cardiff. Deans - _ - story.

Got home by 10.30. Very glad the ordeal was over. Mrs. Thomas said I did allright.

 

Wednesday Feb. 27th

David went off as usual. I wrote article for S. W. Daily News about our visit to Washington. Then we drove all the way down to Marshall Field's to lunch, then took a car & drove past the Hotel where Lloyd George stayed. & on to Lincoln Park. Saw statues of General Grant & Lincoln (a replica of which stands outside Westminster Abbey back home). Had tea. Then David came in, & we went to the Kenwood Hotel a short distance away for Dinner. Drove there & back - tho' only a very short distance. Back & had a very happy evening.

 

Thursday Feb. 28th & Friday 29th

David left as usual. Wrote all morning. Sent articles to S. W. Daily News, Brython Cymraeg. Packed up & left part of luggage in 4933 Dor. Ave. Had lunch at home, & at 5.30 left by car with luggage for Blackstone Hotel, where we met David, who had arranged a very rich & sumptuous dinner for ua. He had also booked a compartment for us as far as Salt Lake City. We went to the Station at 7.30 & Abbie gave us a beautiful basket of fruit, lots of nuts & sweets, & they came to 

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see us off.

We got comfortably settled in & slept in B. cocup.

 

5. Salt Lake City

 

During the night we passed thro' the States of Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, touching a corner of Colorado at Julesburg, back to Nebraska. Crossed the Missouri River at Omaha. The country we passed thro' today is one large tract of grazing land, with homesteads pitched at long distances from each other, & then in groups. Large herd of red cattle, & red brown hogs. Brown chickens. Artesian wells everywhere. Telephone wires everywhere. The ground a light brown colour, not a trace of green anywhere. Saw a removing of furniture on the road - 5 large carts crowded with all sorts of furniture, drawn by a pair of strong horses. Ford cars in every shape & form, clean & dirty - everywhere.

 

No platforms at the stations; roads run across the rails, danger signals up, but very dangerous. Low undulating hills in the distance. Elevation varying from Chicago 590 ft up, Omaha, 1033 feet, Julesburg 3467 ft., to Sherman 8013 ft: highest point on route, which we are due to reach about 10.30.p.m. Must now put writing aside for night.

Read Tale of Triona by W.J. Locke.

 

Saturday Mar. 1st

Got up by 7.a.m. to see the Coal mines Rock Springs & Green River Stations which we passed bet. 7 & 8.a.m. Then on to _ by 11.a.m. & entered State of Utah. We now got to the Land of Canyons. 

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Most wonderfully formed rocks of bright red colour. Most wonderful formation. Sphynx like in shape, formidable in appearance. See p.p.c - through a station called Morgan, quite the most well-kept station on the road. Morgan written in white stones on the station level. We saw in passing one only little churchyard adjoining a _ church right away by itself.

 

We were surprised that we saw so few churches & school. We reached Ogden at 1.5.pm & after putting our packages in the Left Luggage Office, we hired a car & head us to the Ogden Canyon, a distance of 11 miles. 

 

Our driver was an exceedingly well set up young man in knee breeches & in passing thro the town called at his garage for his overcoat & splendid crown & yellow check coat. We drove up through the ravine or pass or canyon, thro’ snow covered rocks & hills, with here & there the hot steam appearing from the hot water springs higher up. Then passed the country houses of the Ogden rich folks, who migrate to these parts as soon as the hot weather comes. 

 

There was one particularly well built & attractive bungalow or chalet, & a large hotel – the Hermitage Hotel. We drove as far as the Artesian Wells from whence Ogden gets her water supply & saw the water coming out in a constant flow. From there we drove on to the Fish Hatcheries – but 2 miles from there we failed to get any further as the road was impassable, on a/c of melting snows. Back to Ogden, & we were informed that a 2nd cousin of Lloyd George lived in the town, a Miss Bradley. We paid 4½ dollars for our trip & dismissed our car.

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Feature of landscape the wonderful reds & yellow of willow trees, & greys of cottonwood tree.

 

Had tea at a nice Restaurant, a very good tea. We walked to station getting p.p.c.’s on route. Left Ogden by the 5.10 train – very hot & stuffy. Got to Salt Lake City soon after 6.p.m. & found that Mr. John Hughes the Depot Master was at the other station, the Rio Grande & Denver – we met a Y.W.C.A Lady Traveller’s Aid - & she telephoned to the Y.W.C.A. & we got a taxi & drove up, some distance away. When we got there my companion was dubious, but I went in, saw bedroom, & as it was quite a nice large one two beds, two windows I took it. We paid 75 cents each for room & paid in advance. We then went out to the Utah Hotel & had some supper in the Cafetaria down below the Hotel. We walked home thro’ a Saturday night crowd, & were not much impressed with the place, had telephoned from hotel to Mr. Tom Hughes the Depot-master, but we were told he was “at large”. Went to bed immediately upon return & slept soundly until 6.a.m. next morning.

 

Sunday, March 2nd 1924

Woke at 6 a.m., had bath at 7. Read several Chapters of Acts. Then dressed, and at 9 a.m. we left the Y.W.C.A. in a taxi, taking our luggage with us and putting it in the Left Luggage Office of the Union Pacific Station.

We then walked thro’ the large Depot Hall with large frescos of the arrival of Brigham Young and the Early settlers in Salt Lake City. I then tho’t I would telephone to our friend the Station Master – he came to the phone, and suggested we should go to see him – just three blocks away. So we went and in the station hall I went up to a short

 

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dapper little man of some 60 odd years – and asked him if he knew where I could find Mr Hughes. I am the man. Then he asked if we were the ladies who had telephoned him – He then asked us if we had had breakfast. We had had some fruit in our room – Abbie’s gift to us both. So we said “No – he then took us to the station buffet where we sat on high stools. Had grapefruit, bacon and griddle cakes too. He insisted upon paying for them. He then went and phoned to some Welsh people. Mr James the British Vice Consul and a Mr Low, Mr Williams an St Senator. I was then called to the phone and had a talk with Mr James who told me we ought to have been at the St David’s Day Celebrations the previous evening and how much he wanted to see us, & also how we ought to tell our message to the women of Utah. He then spoke to Mr Hughes. Eventually it was arranged that we two were to go as far as the Mormon Temple grounds, sign our name in the visitors’ book and wait until the two Welshmen, James and Williams arrived. We took a car as far as the Temple and looked round it. Soon Mr Williams a Welshman from Brechfa Carmarthenshire, the St Senator, arrived with his wife and son, in a fine motorcar. We were standing in the grounds when I saw him. I went up to him and said “Mr Williams”. He said yes. Then he took us to his wife and she said when my husband spoke to you I tho’t you must be some Salt Lake City acquaintances of his, you looked so American! We then went to the Tabernacle, we got there and heard the great organ played, and a discourse given upon

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Mormons here by a young lawyer whose mother is Welsh. We had to leave before we said as Mr James wanted us to see some of the city.

We were photographed outside the Temple in the wonderful sunlight and then made our way to the motorcar, the automobile. I had to tell the W.O.W. story to Mr James, and we went as far as the University on the hill where one had a most splendid view of the city beneath the clearly cut snow clad mountains, like white icing so smooth and straight in appearance – a fine mist rising from the Lake in the distance was a most impressive picture. From there we went to Mr Williams home 1401 Sigsbee Avenue. A very nice home – where we had a very

Welcome cup of tea – we then got into the car and drove past and round the Capitol. The highest point of the city – another fine building. Down to the town under the Eagle Bridge. The old toll gate of the city and to the Station –

Getting our luggage out. We got on to the rails – there are no platforms in America. I got our luggage on board – then we were photographed, alone, and in a group and we started off at 12.55 for San Francisco.

Mr John James, British Vice-Consul, a native of Swansea, born in Haverfordwest, his father being Police Constable living in the Castle, has married an English American lady who was Welsh by adoption – had four children – a very pleasant kind man., who was a keen patriot and who was so very regretful that we had not been at the St David’s Day celebration last evening. He writes for The Druid and had a long story to

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tell of our visit. He said how very disappointed the Salt Lake City Welsh people were because Mr Lloyd George had not been able to go as far as S.L. City. We felt very grateful to Mr Tom Hughes who is a cousin of Mr John Hughes Rhodesia R for introducing us to the kind friends who added so much to our pleasure during the few hours we spent in S.L. City.

I asked Mr Hughes why they had railroads across the streets and no fences along the lines. “As I figure it out, he said, I guess it is cheaper to pay for killing a calf or a ram than to pay for putting up fences”

 

Mr James who is of the Mormon persuasion asked us to say at home that the separation the Mormons have in England is not deserved and that they were a good living people.

Leaving there in good spirits we soon reached Ogden where we were hitched on to the Chicago train – for San Francisco. Crossing the Lake by rail – 30 miles of viaduct, a most wonderful achievement – we had beautiful views of the snow clad mountains around S.L. City – and for a long time they stood out in the landscape as the outstanding feature. After crossing the lake we passed through miles and miles of sandy desert. Yellow sand everywhere with tufts of scrubby growth and a plant in appearance like tamarisk – we have just had Dinner on the train and the beds are being prepared for night, our first experience of a Pullman car, pure and simple.

 

6. San Francisco

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Monday March 3rd

Got up after a poor night’s rest. 48 people sleeping in long deckers far too crowded…Found ourselves in California, the hills, the Nevada Range, covered with snow – a most beautiful sight, the white hill, the green fir trees rising in tier upon tier from the valleys up to the horizon. After breakfast at which we spoke to Mr Cheney and Miss Murdoch of Berkeley University – I went and sat in the observation car and had a talk with Miss Murdoch. The scenery changed rapidly, soon leaving the snow covered hills as we came down down to the valleys – soon I caught sight of an almond tree in blossom outside a tiny house called Cape Horn. Most gorgeous pink – then more and more blossom appeared – some prune and cherry and apple.

 

Miles and miles of orchards – adjoining the railway – but too early for the blossom. Very beautiful scenery. Soon we reached Sacramento, the capital of California and then on past Berkeley – where the State University stands, to Oakland, where we all got off the train and got on board the Santa Clara, the S. Pacific boat which plies between the mainland and San Francisco. A delightfully sunny day, bay quite calm, got to San Fran safely and took taxi to Ramona Hotel – had double bedded room and bath – 4 dollars a night for two – and got our things out went out and had a good tea – Salmon steaks and tea excellent – then to call at Whitcomb Hotel to see if any letters had been sent there – phoned to David Hughes – on the San Fran Chronicle – who said he would call at Hotel about 8. Went to some movie show and back to hotel by 7.35. At 8, Mr and Mrs D Hughes and Mr and Mrs PJ Roberts called and we had a

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Very nice talk with them – going out about 10 pm for a walk through China town – & walked through some of the Chinese shops & admired their goods.Back to Ellis Street, to a Café & had waffles & maple syrup all of us tout ensemble – Mr Hughes made us promise to stay in San Fran until the following Saturday Nov 8 (we had arranged to leave on Friday the 7th) as his Welsh Church wanted to give us a Reception – we agreed to do this. Back to hotel and had good night’s rest.

Boat & Train

 

Tuesday March 4 1924

Mr and Mrs Roberts called about 10 a.m. and we went to the San Francisco’s Chronicle office where I was interviewed by a young lady in brown – who was very superior.  However I talked  to her, & finally she asked me to go up with her to the studio, so as to have my picture taken. This was done – I then re-joined the others downstairs and we went round some of the shops, back to the Robertses apartment where we had a nice lunch and a great Croesowu.

After lunch we started sightseeing in their car, a beautiful 7 seater – and went through Golden Gate Park – where there are flowers, trees and shrubs from every clime in the world. We saw the Stadium and Bandstand where there is a natural awning over the seats of weeping willows, all kept beautifully pruned.

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Aquarium

Japanese Tea Garden – Museum Art Gallery & many groups of Statuary – one “The Thinker” by Rodin – by which we were snapped – we then drove along the Ocean Boulevard, from which we had a fine view of the Pacific Ocean. Driving on through the Presidio, the largest – military Station in the USA including officers’ quarters, barracks hospitals, post office  – From there we went up to the top of Lincoln Park – the Western terminus of the Lincoln Highway with monument to announce the fact. Following on we went up to Twin Peaks – which stood 900 feet about the site – the trip to the peaks is made over the world famous figures 8 drive – from there we drove down to the City, to call upon a Mrs Easton, a peace worker with whom I had an appointment at 5 pm – saw her. She works for President Coolidge’s return & does so as he is in favour of peace – had a nice talk with her, & met a Miss O’Hara afterwards. A breezy Irish woman who took down every word I said as quick as lightning on a type writer. Back to the hotel & about 7.30, we went with Mr and Mrs Roberts to call upon Mr and Mrs D. Hughes. Mr. Hughes is a brother of Mrs Shaubland and is very active with the Welsh actors in San Fran. Got back here, tired and very weary and to bed.

 

At the Museum we saw a kind of silver shield. Found - presented to the late King Edward who was Prince of Wales in 1888? (Annie questions this date) by the south Wales Counties – presented to the Museum by a Dr __ in San Fran who gave it on condition that the facts concerning his possession of it

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should not be made public; until one year after his death. That time has just expired and Hughes was going to get the information.

 

Wednesday March 5th

Mr and Mrs Roberts met us outside out hotel soon after 9 & we started for a most wonderful drive – through the Park route, San Gregorio, passing acres of artichoke fields – on to Half Moon Bay – on the most wonderful scenic road imaginable – up & down, winding in & out the hills covered with growth – until we got almost to the highest point where we had a nice al fresco lunch prepared by Mrs Roberts. Then on to San Marco and on to Palo Alto which is situated in the Santa Clara valley – famous for its enormous fruit production. Half the prunes grown in the world come from this fertile spot. Unfortunately, we were too early for the blossom, which is very beautiful long stems covered with thick white blossom. So closely packed together like one big mass of white flax. No other county in America produces so many cherries, or so many apricots.

 Has a wonderful chapel but too highly coloured for my taste & we drove on to Stanford University which stands in its own grounds of 8000 acres. The buildings are of buff sandstone & they are grouped around open courts or quadrangles and are connected by continuous open arcades of arches & pillars. The no. of students at present is about 2500 – 2000 men and 500 women. 

 

Has a wonderful chapel - but too highly coloured for my taste - and many other buildings.

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Called upon Mrs Tatlock, wife of Prof. of English Philosophy – sister of Mrs Bernard whom we met in Washington. She took us round & showed us different buildings – Drove back comfortably, a lovely drive & got a hotel between 5 & 6, had tea & took tickets for The Covered Wagon film. Soon after 7.30, was rung up by a Miss Gwendolen Evans – a Character – neurotic – hysterical, draws long bow regardless of everything and everybody –  very anxious to see me – knew Tom – from St Asaph – widow of Cons Minister, first woman in Wales to be ordained for the Ministry, lost her husband in Los Angeles running a bench store on Geary 6/34 – Arranged to see her next evening and dine with her. Went to see Covered Wagon – came out at half time – back to hotel and Gwilym Owen called. Talked to him for one hour. Very nice young man. Claudia Owen’s brother – an architect – friend of Garmon Jones – nephew of Morris Caesars.

 

Friday March 6th 1924

Started early for Berkely _ crossed the ferry by key system & had electric train right up to the _! Went straight to Haviland Hall & found Mrs Cheney & Miss Murdoch. Both very kind - gave us lunch & 

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took us round the splendid buildings up the tower of white granite called Jane Sather Campanile to the Greek Theatre - _ & all the buildings of interest. We then walked down to Berkeley town & back to San Fran: by train & boat. Did some shopping - changed & at 4.p.m. Mrs Gwendolen Evans & Mr Samuel Jones, a barrister - from Rhos - called for us & took us to the Cliff Hotel to dinner - a Mr Williams from Llangollen joined us & we had a nice dinner. We then went to the “Orpheum” Playhouse - a mixed performance!! A enjoyable evening - got home about 4.30 tired out.

 

Saturday March 7th 1924

Shopped in the morning; spent too much money. Back about 1:00 p.m. Tired, but found that Mrs. William Owen had called. Then a Mr. John reporter called and asked for an interview; and Miss Morgan from Brecon – a friend of Mrs. Evans - also called.

 

Rested for a time and then got dressed. Prepared address for this evening meeting. Started for Mrs. Evans about 4:30. Had a meal there; also Miss Morgan there, and then to 610 Hyde street to Mrs. Roberts by 7:00 p.m. We drove from home in their car to call upon the Reverend Jones Minister of Welsh church. He was up and better but still far from well. We saw reverend Williams of Oaklands the brother of TH Williams Wilton Sq.

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We then went on to the chapel to the reception and had a very nice gathering. Mr. Salisbury Williams from the harbour commission Presided, and there was singing and recitations and speeches

 

I spoke for about 20 minutes and at close of meeting met Mr. And Mrs. Dunn. Mrs. Dunn is an old Aber student from Pontypool, knew me in Aber. Has been out in S F  Since August. Very homesick when I spoke to her. Met many people who knew Sara. Got back to hotel midnight. Packed and went to bed by 1:00 a.m. Very tired.

 

7. Los Angeles

 

Saturday March 8th 

Called up at 6:30 and by 7:15 a.m. mrs PJ Roberts - whose kindness has been beyond praise - and Mr. Samuel Jones, called for us in their car and drove us to the station where we took the train for Los Angeles.Leaving San Fran at 7:45 a.m. Mr. D Hughes arrived just before the train left, and asked me to write down a bit of what I said last night for him. A glorious day to come out, bright and Sunny. We travelled on the observation car until 4.30, when we went to the dining car for a meal. Had fried fish, fruit salad and Tea.  Have passed through groves of fruit trees & got to Los Angeles by 8:30 p.m. Rev. Dr. Jones minister of the

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Welsh chapel met us in his car - a Buick. Also Reverend & Mrs. John Davis ‘late of Skirland & later of Utica’,  and drove us to the Gates Hotel where we had engaged a room. Almost as soon as I got into the hotel a lady accosted me being anxious to have an interview with me for the Los Angeles Times. I sat and and talked with her and told her of our message and of our visit to the Presidents Tomb in Washington. The interview appeared in Monday's paper, quite a nice lit.

 

After she left, Rev. Dr Jones have me promise to speak on Sunday evening at his church. I consented - tho somewhat reluctantly. We went to bed very tired, but I slept well - very comfortable bed. Got up on

 

Sunday 

a.m. & went out to breakfast at Savoy Hotel then walked to chapel. Dr Jones preached a sermon on peace, mentioned me & my message & announced that I was to speak in the evening service - went back to the Gates Hotel to lunch - then so on after 2. P.m. - Mrs Williams, whom Sara knew as Catherine Evans, & her sister Mrs Morgan, came round in their car & took us out.

 

We went first of all to Evergreen Cemetery to see J.Al. Saunders’ grave - & I put some lovely white carnaiteons (sic) on the grave - ‘A servant of Jesus Christ’ was the only inscription on the grave with his names & dates. From there we went to Alhambra - Ian Gabriel mission. Then I called at Huntingdon to hotel see Mr Ayres a friend of David. He was out. Then through South Pasadena to 212 Brauch street and tea with Mrs. Williams and her husband - Mr. Morgan and their husband joining us.

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All of us drove down to chapel in the car. Chapel crowded. Mr. Jones’s son commenced the service very earnestly and prayerfully. Doctor John Davis introduced me by questioning Sara and John Saunders, and brother John & myself. I then spoke for 40 minutes - without one note! - of our mission.  Mrs Williams drove us back to the hotel, and we went straight up to bed.

 

Monday morning March 11th

Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Morgan were in the hotel before 9:00 a.m. Went to office to get reservations and then drove to Hollywood went to West Coast Production studio, to Beverly Hills Hotel where they were shooting pictures in the garden. Then Santa Monica Ocean Park, Venice, where we went to a Chinese restaurant. Had Chow Mein and Tea in the Chinese-style. I didn't enjoy it.

 

Then back to Los Angeles via Wilshire Boulevard to Gates Hotel, we went in and rested then took a taxi to American Express - as Mrs. Thomas wanted to change a cheque. Had tea at Bow Cafeteria soon after 4:00 p.m. Doctor Jones came round in his car to fetch us, Reverend & Mrs. John Davis. We drove to Long Beach about 20 miles distant and passed several very large oil Wells which had proved of immense value to their owners. Had a meal at a russian cafeteria & drove to call upon the a Mr. Hughes of Denver (whom Peter knew) he was out, saw his daughter, a girl of 18. After saying good-bye we drove back-to the Gates Hotel, a distance of about 20 miles.

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Tuesday March 12th 1924

Left Los Angeles by 11:00 a.m. train. Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Morgan got their car to take us to the station revenues as John Davis this is Daniel James Mr. And Mrs. Johns reverent D Jones and the 2 ladies alone saw us off. A letter was handed to me as I left station - an anonymous letter telling us to get out of the States.

We journeyed through California state all the day-and reached Williams the Junction for the Grand Canyon early-on...

 

8. Grand Canyon

 

Wednesday morning (March 13th)

Got off the train at Grand Canyon and went to the Hotel El Forar for breakfast, a splendid meal. Then booked seats for motor trips -  one round hermit rim & another after lunch in the other direction. The G- C- is beyond description in formation, colour, & effect.

 

We went to a Morie Lecture  given by two brothers called Koll - who had travelled through the Canyon from Colorado river right thro the Gulf of Mexico, a distance of 217 miles. We saw pictures of their wonderful experiences in 2 flat bottomed boats & the many escapades they endured & narrow escapes they had. We then went over to Hope house (the Indian centre). Saw the Indians dance & shook hands with the chief who had a university training. He told us he had already 4 wives but he was still on the market. We walked a dozen to the station, only a few yards by 7:00 p.m. - got on the train & found Section Car 42.  

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Then travelled down to Williams - where we spent the night - & had a good night's rest.

 

Thursday March 13th

In the train all-day. Left Williams at 5:30 a.m. and went along, passed Winston where we transferred from our section to compartment B which was far more comfortable. We got to Albuquerque by 5:10 p.m. & got out & bought mugs & oranges - & Mrs. Thomas had a sandwich - I left her in the church. Got in the car & Mr. Davy called upon us and asked if I was the lady who had come over from Wales with a mission. He is from Briton Ferry. his wife a pretty woman from Llanelly. They lived at Mansfield, a large tinplate industry town near Cleveland Ohio - Mansfield Tinplate Company - Mr. Davy one of the directors. We had a comfortable night.

 

Friday March 14th 1924 

After breakfast Mr. And Mrs. Davy called to see us & were very pleasant & asked us to stay with them in their home in mansfield. He spoke much of the great effects of Prohibition in this country. Difference bet: breaking state and federal law. 

 

The men drank before-and enjoyed it all himself. Now he spends the money on a Ford car. His family enjoy it with him, more money saved.  The Workman did not ask for it. The worst offenders were the people who could buy it - the masters - & the coast towns gave an instance of _.

Page 49

One of the most prominent men in Mansfield providing whisky at 1 of the clubs.  Found out - & though all the wealth of the place was available for his defence, he was condemned to prison for 3 years.

 

We sat and sewed most of the day. & went in to see George & his mother who lived next door to us. Then we went to call upon Mr. & Mrs. Davy in their compartment & they invited them to have dinner with them. An invitation we accepted with the alacrity. Slept badly this night. Got out for 20 minutes at Kansas City.

 

9. Chicago, Niagara Falls & Utica

 

Saturday March 15th

Got up early, & I had breakfast & packed. Got to Chicago by 10 to 10. Got a taxi & drove up to 4933 Lexhampton Avenue where Abbie greeted us very warmly, & where we found a bundle of letters awaiting us - 3 from Peter, 4 from Tom, 2 from Lily, 1 from John - & many others. Tidied up & went round to station to secure sections for the trip to Buffalo. $5.63 each - Back to Abbie’s & then had lunch & down to Field Museum by 3.p.m. Met David there & went to a lecture on Egyptian Mummies.

 

Mrs Pearson soon arrived & we went to David’s room & she told me of the Student Fellowship and spoke for an hour - wanted me to be the sponsor for Wales & gave me brooch & information on movement etc, etc –

 

We drove back to Dorchester & then had tea, & went out to the Kenwood to dinner at 6.30, walking there and back!

Page 50

Got back home and listened to the radio- a terrible Sobotch - & it was soon turned off. We sat & talked & read papers - Went to bed & slept well.

 

Sunday March 16th

Got up & had breakfast at 10 a.m – then packed up my things and a Mr. Cheney, a friend of David, called with his little girls Sally & Betty - we sat & talked, had lunch at 1.30 & left at 2.45 for 53rd Street Station on the Michigan Central RG. David & Abbie drove with us & we left at 3.11 in Car 8 - Section 807 for Niagara Falls. A lovely afternoon, & passed along the side of Lake Michigan & thro’ small orchards of peaches and vines and to Kalamazoo where 2/3rds of celery used of[sic] the United States is grown.7.20 p.m. just passed through Battle Creek. A young Belgium girl called Georgette came and spoke to us

 

Monday- March 17th

Our kind porter on the train called us before 6.a.m. by a gentle “tap, tap” under our beds & told us we were nearing Niagara. We dressed quickly & hastily & had all our baggage & ourselves in readiness when the train steamed in to Niagara Falls Station, at 6.05. Too dark to see anything of the Falls, as we passed along.

 

We got off the train & went into the station & began wondering what we had better do about getting in touch with Elined Prys who had arranged to meet us at Buffalo that day. As Buffalo was 23 miles beyond Niagara we decided to get off there & get in touch with Elined at Lennox Hotel Buffalo – the place arranged for our meeting.  We phoned to the manager 

Page 51

of Lennox Hotel, but she was not there. We then went to a café the other side of the street from the station - the 3 of us - Mr Thomas, Georgette, & myself.  We then sent a long wire to Elined to Lennox Hotel. We then made arrangements for going round to see the wonders of Niagara Falls.  We started walking through the Park & had our first view of the wonderful Falls - we saw two rainbows as we saw the Falls. We then arranged to take the Scenic Trip around the Falls & through the Gorge - paying $1.50 for the round trip.

 

We got over the great steel arch bridge to Canada and on to Table Rock- where we got off & went into the stores where there were various things for sale, made of spav and leather etc - we decided to go down to see the Falls from inside - so we donned oil skins, sou’westers and rubber Napoleons & set forth! Going into an elevator, we went down, down into the bowels of the Earth & came eventually to a spot where we got out & where a tunnel had been cut thro’ the rocks & had several peeks of the Falls from within & behind, so to speak. Large parts of the water was frozen, & the tunnel was lined & beautifully decorated with icicles - many of them yards long –I tumbled (nothing new) on the ice & slipped many yards, but our valiant escort rescued me & I soon found my feet again.  We retraced our steps & then got back to the top safely - After removing the extra clothing, & making some purchases we made our way to the Power Houses of the Canadian Electrical Plant & were conducted over the whole place and shown everything of interest by a guide. Booklet gives all details of this & of our Scenic Trip. We then continued our trip around & had most gorgeous views of everything. Setting back by 1.30 - we went to the same place for lunch – Louis’s Restaurant.

 

Page 52

No sign of Elined.

We played round bought some trifles s.p. post came until 3.42pm when we left by train for Utica.  Leaving Georgette alone on the platform.  We had a pleasant trip by train to Utica; passing through Buffalo, Syracuse, Rochester, where Miss Carver & her brother in law came to see us pass through. Miss Carver looked well & bonnie & was very cheery & told us the news of Elined’s engagement to an Austrian Count!!  She told us she intended sailing for home on April 5th.

 

We got to Utica at 9.42, where we were met by Rev T.O. Hughes (slim /con) of one of the Welsh American Churches who was suffering at Utica –Mr Henry Hughes of the “Utica Press” & Mr Morris Williams secretary of the Cymreigyddion Society. We waited about for a time, hoping to have news of Elined & I gave Mr Hughes a short interview & then we went by taxi to the Hotel Utica, where reservations had been made for us by the Welsh friends.

 

Upon reaching the hotel we found several ladies awaiting our arrival - Shy, timid women who gave us a warm welcome, standing in a semi circle & beaming upon us & we were so tired, we just wanted to go to our rooms to rest- we were shown our rooms 605-606. Two rooms & a bathroom- reserved for Elined & Mrs Thomas 7 me. We had just begun to unpack when two ladies arrived - Mrs Hitchcock, of whom more anon, & Mrs Lloyd, wife of brother in law to Mrs Elvet-Lewis, thro her first husband. The former talked & sputtered. The other tried to get in a little remark edgeways, but failed. We were then left in peace & had a good night’s rest.

 

10. New York and Homewards

Page 53

Tuesday March 18th

Had our breakfast brought up to me & then got dressed by 10.a.m. Had to give an address for this luncheon which was fixed for 12 o’clock. At 11.a.m. Mrs John Evans who had tried to arrange a Welsh tea party called at the Hotel to see me & with her was Mrs Professor (?) _ Evans. After discussing the matter I arranged to meet the Welsh women at 10:30 the following morning at the Welsh Schoolroom. At 12 we went back to the room where luncheon was and where we found a company of 450 to 500 people assembled. Including a large number of men - the lunch had been arranged by the St. Davids’ Womens’ Club & they had invited representatives of the 10 other womens’ clubs in the city & these 10 clubs and representatives at the speakers table. Mrs Hitchcock, pres. of the St Davids’ club presented - I after having a good meal - Mrs Hitchcock spoke & introduced me - then I spoke & then meetings were extended to me from his diff: representatives present - a bouquet of sweet peas was given to Mrs Thomas & me by the President of the Jewish Women’s Club who spoke afterwards & said something like this.

 

Page 54

Mr Morris Williams & Mrs Parry, Pres. of Cymreigyddion Society spoke to us & all acclaimed Wales & us for coming over with such a message & promised to do all they could towards promoting the ideals of World Peace - they also sent greetings & promises & appreciation to the women of Wales. It was a very pleasant gathering - well managed and successfully arranged. We heard echoes of domestic misunderstanding & differences. - We held quite a reception after the luncheon was over until Mrs Hitchcock & a Mrs Hasard captured us & took us for a drive around the Boulevard of Utica - then to the Citizen Club - where we listened to the dullest accounts of some places on the Hudson - letters had been written by some people living in this place & were read by women who had no idea of the elements of voice production - then the chair woman called upon me quite unexpectedly to give my message - I did so - then _ with Mrs Alcock & Miss Butcher & some other ladies as guests of the Citizen Club - Then I had an hours rest mercifully for I was very tired -

 

To the Church where the Welsh meeting was to be held - presided over by Mrs Morris Williams - Dr Schneider gave greetings on behalf of the Churches of the City - & spoke splendidly.

Some sighing. Welsh hymns sung & I gave an account of the memorial & we were presented with an American flag by Mr Parry, President of the Cymreigyddion Soc: & after several other speakers had taken part the meeting terminated.

Nellie Owen knew  a Gwilym Owen in Liverpool. 

Several people came & spoke to us & we had quite a reception. We then walked back to the hotel with Mrs Hitchcock who took us into a restaurant - for an iced drink. A peculiar & clever lady this, - full of kindness, nuce, and ability, spends more

Page 55

than half her time from home - lives 5 miles outside Utica - has a husband & a boy in college & a girl training as _ at college in Utica. Her husband has two telephones to the home but tells her he can never get her there. She attends various meetings & is out late almost every night & sees very little of her family - She has no maid & does most of her housework in the mornings before leaving for a days’ work outside her home. 

 

We were glad to get to bed as we were very tired - no news of Elined though I wired to Buffalo in the morning suggesting of her movements.

 

Wednesday March 19th

Had breakfast downstairs, packed and ready by 10 a.m. when Mrs Hitchcock called & took us & our baggage in a car to see Mrs Thomas, another lady from Ffestiniog who was well up in the affairs of Wales, tho ‘having’ left there many many years ago. A great admirer of Tom. Called her firstborn Tom Ellis, her second William Evans Gladstone, her third  John Morley, and if she had had a 4th he was to be Owen Morgan Evans – very interesting and well read old lady but had got hold of some mylie about her father and mine starting Aberystwyth College!!

 

From seeing her we went – on to the schoolroom of the Welsh Chapel, where about 50 women had assembled to meet us. Mrs Saw: (Proff) Evans presided & she expressed the satisfaction & pleasure of those present etc etc. I then said a few words – & then Mrs Thomas & I were presented with gifts. I had a silver fruit & flower vase – & Mrs Thomas had a pie slice. We both acknowledged the gifts with much emotion – it was such a surprise; reowing from these women whom we had never known or not before – it was truly unexpected, but very pleasant. That aud ed said 

Page 56

of Lily’s and a maid of Uncle D.C. Davies who gave me a present of a cup and saucer and plate wh: belonged to Uncle & Aunty Davies. Green & white. Met a relative of Tom’s - a Mrs Rees, who gave me a patchwork bag. From there we went under Mrs Louis Williams’ guidance to the station, where we met Mrs Hitchcock & some other ladies.

 

One  section sat on one side of the bench – another section on the other - Mrs Hitchcock representing one element - Mrs John Evans the other & they did not blend. They were all very kind to us, but not quite so understanding towards each other. We left Utica happily after receiving much kindness from the Welsh friends there.

 

We had a very pleasant trip down from Utica to New York – along the banks of the Hudson River – the scenery was quite Swiss in parts, the snow capped mountains behind & little islands appearing now and again all beautifully green-fresh looking.

 

Arriving at New York, we made our way to the Women’s University Club. I found letters and papers awaiting us – we had dinner at this Club and Miss Chaudor joined us. Then Mrs Thomas and I went to see “Stepping Stones'' at the Globe Theatre- Mrs Thomas standing treat. A very enjoyable entertainment. Mrs Fred Stone, Mrs Stone & their daughter being the chief actors – enjoyed it thoroughly. Back to club and to bed – had looked up Elined at Y.W.C.A, but did not get news of her.

 

Thursday March 20th

Elined arrived in the Club, told us she had been to Buffalo & Niagara but found no news of us, so went on to stay with some friends, making no effort to find out where we were in Utica. We went to change money & do a little shopping in the morning – & then returned to the Club. 

Page 57

Elined & I were invited to lunch at the Colony Club by Mrs Ruth Morgan. We got there by 1.15pm & met Miss Morgan & her mother, had a delicious lunch, & Mrs Morgan spoke of messages which should be sent by women of America to women of Wales in reply to their message. These replies were provided for the Annual Meeting of the Welsh Council of the League of Nations Union – in Whit week. Mrs Morgan brought us back to the Club in a taxi and left us there. Later in the afternoon we three went to Ex. Pres Roosevelt’s first home to tea, the house is now a museum. We were welcomed by Mrs Alexander Lambert who is much interested in the work of the museum. Then Mrs Laidlaw arrived & presented to with the the papers, appertaining to the arranging of the luncheon & the Hospitality Committee etc - all put up neatly in vellum cases. Then Mrs Lewis the Librarian joined us & we all had tea together. Elined left early to meet Dr Wylder. Mrs Thomas & I went with Mrs Laidlaw in a taxi to the Club. 

 

We had some telephone calls to see to, including one from Leila Megane, who had decided to get married the following day, & wished me to give her away. We then dressed ourselves in our evening clothes, and sat waiting in the lobby for Miss Chaudor’s arrival. She had promised to take us to the League of Nations Non Partisan Dinner at the Biltmore Hotel.

 

Arrived there in good time, & met many old and new friends. I was put to sit at the speakers table between Mr Frank Emerson and Mrs James Neal. After speeches by Mrs vanderslip, Mrs Little and Dr Levenmore I was called up to give a 2 mins speech - It was a case of “Play up Wales”.

Page 58

Friday March 21st 1924

In the morning we went down to White Star Offices & Customs House & got our tickets stamped & labels etc – Took a taxi from there to call upon Mr John Fairman – & bid him goodbye with many grateful thanks for all his kindness to us. From there went up Fifth Avenue to Maurice’s Restaurant 49th Street to meet Megane and her fiancé. They arrived in due time & we had lunch with them - & heard the final arrangements for the wedding.

 

After a very nice lunch, French looking, we four & Mr Schang the best man went in a taxi to the Welsh Chapel 120th Street. Megane dressed in a covert coating costume, light fawn with felt hat to match. Rev Jospeh Evans performed the ceremony in Welsh, & I 

Page 59

gave the bride away. There were a few spectators – including Mr & Mrs Wm Hughes and Mrs Cobina Bright & her little girl - Mrs Roberts and Mrs Allison etc etc.

 

From there, Mr and Mrs Hughes, Mrs Allison, Mrs Thomas & I went as far as Rev D.M. Richards’ house, & I went in to see how Mr Richards was – he was in bed, & was not too well. Stayed only a few minutes as they were all waiting for me in the car.

 

We drove back to Mrs Hughes’ house & at 5.30pm the bride and groom arrived & we had a sumptuous dinner. We then all went along to the Welsh Church where a reception had been arranged in our honour – Dr Keigwhin Dr Keigwhin presided, the Minister of one of the Presbyterian Churches in New York – Addresses of welcome were delivered by Rev. Joseph Evans on behalf of the Welsh Churches of the city, by ladies representing different societies, by a gentleman kept a Welsh Lodge etc etc. Megane sang ‘Y. Nsfoedd a Cartref’ & her husband accompanied her. A beautiful bouquet of trees was presented to we by Mrs Wm Hughes who also made a charming speech. A farm – an oak tree - etc etc.

 

Megane got the flowers meant for Elined. I spoke for about 25 minutes, giving the message. Mr Bowman, a friend of Mr Hughes, took Mrs Thomas & me back to the Club in his car – via Broadway all lighted up and brilliant – getting there at midnight. I then started packing and got to bed bet. 1.30 or 2am.

Page 60

Saturday March 22nd 1924

Got up early & had breakfast - had telephone message from Rev: __ Vicar of St John the Divine, saying a Miss Portia Willis had tried to get me on the phone all the previous day wanting me to speak to them at a meeting the last Thursday in April, had heard me speak at the Biltmore Dinner, much impressed with my sincerity etc. He took a load off my mind, I had feared I had made a fool of myself on the Thursday night - he re-assured me. Had a phone message from Mrs McCulloch. She was all unified with La Grippe. Her husband phoned for her - got our things ready - cabled to Peter re Megane’s wedding & our sailing. & got down to the boat by 10.a.m. - saw Mr Bird White Star Line Agent, who had heard me on the radio on Thursday night - Mr. Fairman, Mr & Mrs Allison came to see us off.

 

Incident of Elined running off with Miss Parry Jones’s luggage & coat. Got our cabin D-58 & went on deck to see American sky line as we drifted down the river. As the Olympic was turning to maker her way down - the Fort St George a boat making for Bermuda with 300 passengers onboard came across the Olympic & was badly damaged. The Olympic only having her propellor deranged - we were wholly unconscious of the accident until we were out at sea. Had a splendid view of the Statue of Liberty - Had lunch & dinner in dining room. Not too appetising - went to bed - but could not sleep -

Page 61

Sunday March 23rd  1924

Got up & dressed but did not feel well. Stayed in bed all day – could eat nothing -  had lemon water and orange twice to drink. Mr Jones Chief Steward, a native of Llandudno, now of Liverpool, very kind & attentive – Mr and Mrs Elliot the Purser called to see me in the Cabin– very anxious to do all to please and make us comfortable. Rather a rough day. Ship’s rum.

 

Monday March 24th 1924

I spent the day in bed – no hught for anything bad throat. Wanted no food. Read Receynaw’s Steps. Ship’s rum. 511 rules.

 

(Tuesday) Sunday March 25th

Got up & on deck by 11:30am. Had lunch & dinner on deck. Mr Jones Chief Steward most kind and attentive. Lazed, slept & read. Bright & sunny day. Ship’s rum. 511 rules.

 

Wednesday March 26th 1924

Got up about 9:30 & have been on deck all day. Bright and sunny day. Had nice lunch of lamb cutlets, met Mr John Davies, the ship’s butcher, a member of Webster Rd Chapel, Liverpool, a native of Ruthin. Felt better & better, spent the whole day on deck. Ship’s rum 513 rules. Boat going very steadily – with so little movement.

Page 62

Thursday March 27th 1924

Went on deck early & had lunch and dinner up there. Ship going very steadily. Read John Galsworthy’s

Mr John Davies very attentive. Sat up until nearly 10pm had better night.

Ship’s rum 511 rules. A little rusty & wet at night.

 

Friday March 28th 1924

Have sat indoors writing letters most of afternoon. This a.m Mr Jones took us round the ship. The kitchens, store rooms, first class accommodation etc. Getting nearer & nearer home a diolch mawr au hwey – Rhyfeddol niordda niae dior wedi bod I ni heb au hap naa ddauwwain Diolch lddo!

 

Copied out article for S.W.D news - not very good.

*image of memorial cover*

 

Notes

Page B1

Fares 60 10 0

               10 0

         2    10 5

         2    0   0

 

         £70  0  0

 

Tips   5 0  0

???   50   0  0

????   -----------------    

£70     130

           70

         ---------

           £200 

Page B2

It is the subjective matter that counts not the objective.

It depends what we bring to life.

The secret is inside.

Success and failure, prosperity or ???

ill health, bad health, it will

come to us all.

Carry at the centre of your life

Devotion of Divine in Life

The consciousness of the Love of

God which includes love of Man

That is real Religion

Fosdick as a boy went to pick

a quart of raspberries

he picked 2 quarts and surprised

the family. Redeemed a situation

by changing the inner attitude

If you habitually live like this

win a great prize.

 

at Stanford University

500 women students

1500 men

---

at Berkeley

10000 students

Equal member of each

Society club

Page B3

Continuation of Fosdyck’s sermon

 

Every sin has its nemesis

Begins to level up thro the

halls of God grind slowly ??

What diff[erence] can it make what

life I live? Trouble comes to all.

but clean and unclean trouble are

so different. Jesus and Judas died

the same day, but were they alike?

Mothers of Gol[gotha] How different

There are some things we can’t

help having happened to us, but

we can keep our trouble clean.

If we love God, all things work

Together for good.

“To them that love God.

Eccles[iasticus]: takes negative attitude

to Life.

Paul takes positive and creative

to Life.

Divine alchemy that will

transmute lead to gold

Prayer of George Mathesonthe

blind preacher. “O God whether

thou counsel in sunshine or rain” 

Page B4

One building stories high

New York a city of heights

Washington a city of beautiful buildings

Chicago a city of lengths

         Michigan Avenue 60 miles long

Utica a city of beautiful boulevards

Salt Lake City a city of Mormons

San Francisco city of hills

Los Angeles city with beautiful

                     suburbs

Page B5

I am a broken piece of Machinery

When the machinery is broken

-- the feeble voice trailed off for a

moment then resumed

                                 “I am ready”

With these words on his lips the great

war president passed into the Great

Beyond. Woodrow Wilson had

?????? up on his immortality

 

It is too soon to know his place in history

that decision must be made by

Posterity, the divine Sovereign who

Makes and unmakes the reputation

of the heroic dead.

W[oodrow] W[ilson] was an idealist and gladly

suffered the fate of most idealists

he said

“I would rather fail in a cause I know

some day will triumph than win

in a cause I know some day will fail

 

I want people to love me, said Wilson

once to his Sec[retary] J. P. Tumulty

“but they never will”

Not to have a place in the hearts of

his people was part of the cross he

 

bore – he had their confidence, he won

their admiration but he missed

their love.

 

It was his cause which had triumphed

not Woodrow Wilson

His countrymen they never love him

But can there be any question

that they will revere his memory

rejoice in his achievements?

The world will make a shrine

of his grave.

 

His body is interred in the new

National Cathedral on Mount

St Alban. ?????? which

overlooks the capital in much the

same way that the Temple of Jesus

above overlooks the landscape

?? about it.

The cathedral has not yet been

finished; the apse is completed

where his body lies. If the

founders of this shrine for patriots

of all faiths are to realize their

dream of making it the Westminster Abbey

of America, housing the remains of our

great dead, with W.W. they have well begun





 

END OF TRANSCRIPTION

 










 

 

2019 Transcription Project and Early Draft

A Personal Account of the Welsh Women’s Peace Petition to America of 1924

 

Background to the Women’s Peace Petition

https://www.wcia.org.uk/peace-heritage/womens-peace-petition/ 

 

Scanned Pages from Annie’s Diary in the National Library

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157680212085978

 

Finding Aid – National Library

https://archives.library.wales/index.php/annie-j-hughes-griffiths

 

Sections

1.     Setting Sail for America

2.     New York

3.     Washington

4.     Salt Lake City & San Francisco

5.     Los Angeles & Grand Canyon

6.     Chicago & Niagara Falls

7.     New York & Homewards

8.     Notes in back

 

Volunteer Brief (May 2019)

 

Background - with Oct 2020 updated links

The Welsh Women’s Peace Petition to America is a ‘hidden history’ that was unearthed in 2014 when the leather binding was found in the Temple of Peace Library, with its inscription from 390,296 signatories calling for America to join and lead the League of Nations – to underpin the post WW1 Peace agreement, and avoid prospect of another World War. Organised by women of the Welsh League of Nations Union through 1923, the Petition was taken to America – in a specially constructed oak chest – by a delegation of 3 Welsh women representing the peace movements and women of Wales:

 

·       Mrs Peter (Annie Jane) Hughes Griffiths, President of the Welsh League of Nations Union Women’s Committee (what a sign of the times that a leader of the women’s movement, even just after women got the vote in 1918, is known to history by her husband’s name!). View pages 11-12 for more about Annie.

·       Miss Mary Ellis (organised much of the tour itinerary by travelling to America in December ahead of Annie’s arrival; one of the first Women Schools Inspectors for Wales, went on to marry Rev Gwilym Davies, Director of the Welsh League of Nations Union)  

·       Miss Elined Prys (very active in World Student Christian movement relief work post-WW1, where she met Walter Kotschnig - the ‘Polish Count’ referred to in Annie’s Diary. They emigrated to the USA where he became one of the founders of the UN at Dumbarton Oaks, and Elined became a world leading Psychologist). 

 

View Page 13 (of PDF) for more about Mary and Elined.  

 

READ THE STORY!

 

Women, War & Peace and Heddwch Nain Mamgu

Over 2017-19, WCIA have displayed the Women’s Petition as part of our programme of work on ‘Women War & Peace’ which has included a touring exhibition - accompanied by beautiful photographs and stories by war photojournalist Lee Karen Stow. The petition inspired many, including a group of current Gwynedd Peace Activists who from International Women’s Day 2018 formed the project / group ‘Heddwch Nain Mamgu’ to galvanise further interest in the petition. A shared aspiration is to digitise the petition signatures now held in the Smithsonian in Washington, and reunite these with the binding from the Temple of Peace, with the support of the National Library of Wales and others. Jill Evans MEP has visited and seen the oak chest on a recent trip.

 

What is ‘Annie’s Diary’?

In April 2019, whilst researching Welsh League of Nations material, Craig stumbled across a ‘finding aid’ for a woman’s peace diary in an unrelated collection (the T.I.Ellis Family Papers). Annie-Jane Ellis turned out to actually be ‘Mrs Peter’ Hughes Griffiths – and the diary was her personal memoir of the voyage to America in 1924 with the Women’s Peace Petition. Craig photographed the diary and uploaded the images, in page order, onto Flickr at the link below (to be added to People’s Collection Wales once complete). To view, if you do not already have a Flickr account you may need to set up a login.

 

VIEW THE DIARY

 

Transcribing the Diary - March 2019 Brief 

Our aim is to transcribe (write up electronically) the whole diary by the end of May – hopefully to coincide with the anniversary of the 1926 North Wales Women’s Peace Pilgrimage - so that it can be made available and accessible to the wider Welsh public. By dividing the work between a team of volunteers – ‘crowdsourcing’ – each person will only need to do a few pages, as follows (NB dates are inclusive)

 

1.     Pages 1-8: Cover + February 2nd – 9th 1924

Craig

2.     Pages 9-19: Feb 10th – 20th 1924

Ffion

3.     Pages 19-27: Feb 21st – March 1st 1924

Martin

4.     Pages 27-35: Sun March 2nd – Thur 6th 1924

Fi

5.     Pages 36-41: Fri March 7th-Fri 14th 1924

Marion

6.     Pages 42-48: Sat March 15th – Mon Mar 18th 1924

Katy

7.     Pages 48-54: March 19th (‘Wednesday’) – 28th

Meinir

8.    Pages B1-B5: Notes in back of diary

TBC

 

‘Book Club’ Night - Wed 5th June, 5-7.30pm, Temple of Peace

On 5th June, we will gather in Room 39 at the Temple to ‘unveil’ Annie’s story! The idea is that each of us will read / ‘present’ our chapter, and as we progress we’ll all ‘experience’ Annie’s adventure unfolding (as long as you resist the temptation to read the whole diary beforehand!). Tracy Pallant, from Valley & Vale Community Arts, has kindly agreed to record the event to create a small feature clip about Annie’s story.

 

Suggested Format for Transcription

Keeping it simple, I’d suggest just writing it up into a Word Document, Email or similar – as it appears in Annie’s handwriting (or as close as you can work out).

 

Notes of Interest

The diary may contain references to things / people / places / events of historical or social interest, and my suggestion would be to pick out any that arouse your interest, and add a footnote (in MS Word, go to ‘References’ then ‘add footnote’) / research online / find out more. Only so much as you have time for though – no high expectations.

 

For example, as a train geek the entry above fascinated me from Annie’s mention of the special carriage; and I ‘googled’ these along with a couple of people from Annie’s list of well wishers, appearing as example footnotes below.

 

Once you have completed your section, please email to [email protected] – I shall piece them all together into one document, and add the transcription to the digitised pages.

 

Suggested Format for Presentation

My suggestion for our ‘reading group’ on Wednesday 5th June would be to have 10-15 minutes per chapter, in which we:

 

a)    Read out your chapter, as written

b)    Share your personal response / highlights / thoughts with the group: Any particular historical footnotes of interest? What questions, ideas or issues does it throw up for you?

c)     Group reactions / discussion. 

 

At the end of the readings, we’ll have a brief discussion and reflections on the overall experience, and any ideas / inspiration to have emerged. I don’t yet know how thrilling or otherwise it’ll be: we may be ready for a G&T, a doctorate, or a mug of cocoa and bed!

 

Any questions drop me an email on [email protected]

Book Club - Film (March 2020)

 

3 short films were produced for International Women’s Day March 8th 2020, by Tracy Pallant and Amy Peckham from Valley & Vale Community Arts / Oasis, recording the process of the ‘Book Club’ and the initial ‘unveiling’ of Annie’s Story. These are worth watching to understand the context for future work.

 

  1. Annie’s Diary - Main Feature (13m 5s) - includes material from both:

  2. ‘Annie’s Diary’ - Trailer (2 m 25s)

  3. Alaw Primary ‘Peace School’ project (3m 31s)

  4. Playlist  


 

Transcription Tidying (Nov 2020)

 

The Transcription below has remained in ‘need of tidying’ over the year, hampered by the COVID Lockdown and closure of the Temple of Peace to staff, volunteer & public access. However, some staff have returned from full to part-time furlough, and although WCIA has no funding source for heritage activities, we are identifying pieces of work that can be taken forward by reliable volunteers - one of which, completion of the Diary Transcription, is already being referenced by volunteers worldwide. 

 

The Transcription ‘task’ involves 2 stages:

 

Stage 1 - Missing pages

  1. Transcribing 8 pages that were missing from the originally digitised set. The page links have been marked in Orange through the text, linking to their location in the Flickr Album. 

  2. The Missing pages (or dates straddling these pages) seem to be:

    1. Page 10 

    2. Page 12

    3. Page 16

    4. Page 19

    5. Page 22

    6. Pages 53-55 

    7. Page 60

 

Stage 2 - Tidying the Transcript document 

  1. Format the overall document for consistent fonts / text sizes / titles and colour coding throughout (eg Page Links, Volunteer-added research notes, etc - are these needed?)

  2. Go through the text to identify and correct uncertain words, where possible. Where unclear, leave highlighted for WCIA team to work through remaining edits.

  3. Either work within Google Drive document, or re-upload your completed edit.   

 

PAGE 3

1. Setting Sail for America 

 

Feb 2nd 1924

 

A beautiful bright morning, sun shining. Had a light breakfast, and at 9.10am the taxi ordered overnight arrived. After depositing my trunk, suit case & hold all within, Peter, Mary & I got in & drove comfortably to Euston Station. Arrived there at 9.35 and found our train already on Platform 14.

 

A Saloon Carriage had been reserved for us through the extreme kindness of Mr Glynnne Roberts [1] of Euston Station, & this was no ordinary saloon, but a Drawing Room with comfortable easy chairs, table etc.[2] The baggage was deposited inside, & very soon friends began to arrive. Among those were: Ms Mary Davies & Mr Arthur Davies; Mr & Mrs Hopkyn Morris MP[3]; Mr Goronwy Owen MP [4]; Rev James Nicholas; Mr Selwyn Davies…

 

PAGE 4

 

... Mrs. Hannah Williams mr Wilfred Rowland Mr. Jones Mr. Glynn Evans from king cross cefal clapham Junction people W Lloyd Williams Hereford Mrs. W rowlands and mrs Lynne Roberts who had come to see miss Carver off  . Reverend William Davis miss mag bobberts miss Davis kill forge and  Many others. 

About 1015 Mr. Nicholas  Castle street called upon Mrs. Hockin Norris to present me with a beautiful bouquet of purple Iris tulips anemones and violets tied with beautiful shop silk ribbon from which was the following inscription.

BLANK!

Reporters were busy taking own notes several photos were taken by the press association this she did with a kind expression of good wishes for the delegation.

Page 3

Then Mrs. Boyd Robson presented me with a beautiful bouquet of yellow daffodils tied with yellow shot green reben with the following inscription

BLANK

Mr. Goronwy Owen then spoke a few words  Summarising the gesture which was being and dissipated between Wales and America And wishing us God speed.

I said a few words in reply and fried thank them adequately and fittingly. We then got aboard the train. Mrs Carver reverend William Davis and myself I said a big good-bye to all-and kissing of Mary Davis and Peter only.

We soon steamed out of the station loaded with good wishes. I forgot to say that the members of my II class had give me a most glorious basket of choice fruit have presented by Mrs. Rowland's barrier street.

 

Page 5

 

... Accompanied with a card with this inscription

Blank

This to me was a delightful surprise and greatly appreciated as a proof of personal devotion and affection. Mrs. William Davies mrs Carver and myself had lunch at 12:30 we reach to lime street at 2::30 p.m.. Here we were met by miss Anna rowlands and miss men I rowlands and we took a taxi and drove down to the princes landing stage.

Here we got on the boat, the SS Cedric,  And a representative of the white Star Line company made himself known to me and told me that the oak case containing the 390296 signatures was safely in the hold David I soon found Mrs. Melhuish Thomas who was coming out for the Trip and Eluned Pryd who was one of the non official deputation.  Miss preece and Mr. Davis and myself...

Page 5

... Work photographed several times. Saw Mr. And Mrs. Lloyd Phillips and the editor of the "Brython"  And his daughter on board. All so Mrs. John Edwards. As I was coming app the companion way with the lovely bouquets in my hands a lady exclaimed "oh she must have made a mistake - she must be a first class passenger with those glorious flowers."

Leila Megane  And her fiance Osborne Roberts also going on this boat she goes 1st class he 2nd class . The line between 1st and 2nd is severely observed on the bout.

All our friends, our goodbye friends,  Had to leave the boat about 3:15 and we left soon after 3:30 p.m.. It was a dull day. But not wet. We steamed down the river and soon had T. I found at the purser's office about 15 telegrams, and just as many letters wishing me luck from the following:

 

Page 6

 

BLANK

Afterwards Mrs. Thomas H who shared cabin 152 unpacked our things some of them at any rate and then we went to the state Room and wrote letters. Then did a came at 7:00 p.m.. Mrs. Thomas miss Carver Alina the priest and I had table number 5 and we enjoyed a good meal.  We sat on afterwards in the dining Room which is also the recreation Room

Page 7 

We turned into a banks about 9:45 I have the top bunk and as we have a port hole we have plenty of air. Had a good night, woke & slept  All through from 10:00 p.m. until nearly 8:00 a.m. next morning.

FEB 3rd SUNDAY

Got to Queenstown by 8:00 a.m.. Several passengers came on board and there was no morning service on that account. We hired our deck chairs for the voyage - paying 6 shillings and sixpence each for their hire -  Spent the morning reading talking started reading Saint Matthew's gospel. Brok biscuits at 11:00 a.m. had breakfast in bed got up and was on deck at 9:00 a.m. Walked round around 1st and 2nd class quarters had a lot in early telegram from Peter. Than lunch at one and then at out on deck again. A dull sunless day but quite fresh.  The coast of Ireland is disappearing from sight as I write -  The girls following us with their at a back an impartient

Page 7

crowd of birds wanting something undoubtedly,  But as their language is unknown to me, we cannot supply their needs.  So far a very happy and pleasant trip. Spoke to a miss Marjorie Lindsay, assistant to professor OT Jones at Owens college who is going out to the trite as a "Frances Riggs" scholar to study USA  Geology for one year. She knows Olive Wheeler and knew of Mary William's. Like O T Jones,  Had come to Manchester station to see her off on her departure. She goes for one year - she has linked herself to our foursome -

February 3rd 1924 

Had tea and tried to sit down to dinner but failed to do so so retired to cabin and bed have lemon water and fruit. Clock put back one and a 1/2 hours. A bit of a swell but not unpleasant.

Monday February 4th 

Stayed in bed for breakfast had a nice one bath. Then on deck for a walk and then to cabin and slept until 130. Had lunch. Mrs. Rowland's of Portland a first class passenger called see me. He is from Aberdovey originally. Took Duallgu for  Some months last year. Going with his wife to Saint Kansas Hot Springs to say if they will cure her. She has sleeping sickness.

Rested in afternoon and on deck, had tea and dinner and out on deck again. Saw leila megane and  Sat on her deck with here to bed early at 8:30 p.m.. Had a poor night. Slept only until 2:00 a.m. 12 o'clock put back 38 minutes more, sea beautifully smooth.

Tuesday Feb. 5th

See lescom had a bad day did very little he had managed to get on deck that's spent most of the Day lying down.

 

PAGE 8

Wednesday Feb. 6 

Took no males in saloon. Spent most of the day-in the cabin. Felt sick and needy and did not go on deck a tall. Heavy rolling of boat.

Thursday Feb. 7th 

much the same. Took no males in saloon and just sat about and slept and read novels. Had very little zest for anything. Sea still rough.

 

2. New York

 

Annie Jones’ Diary: Sunday 10th Feb to 2oth Feb

Sunday

Had service in 1st Class Saloon. Leila Megane sang ‘O Fryniau Caersalem’ as a solo, & a few of us sang it over again as a chorus. After the service was over, a gentleman came & asked us if we were a Welsh choir on in the States . . . . very tickled at this as our singing was truly atrocious. Went & had orange juice & grape fruit at [….?....]. Joined [?] . . . . . . he gave me ‘Enchanted April [?]’ as a gift. Spent evening writing letter to Peter & others.

Ship’s rum. “It gets me giddy”.

 

Page 9 

 

Monday, Feb 11th

Called at 7 a.m. for breakfast at 7.30. Had reached the end of our journey. Went on deck after breakfast. I saw land and different boats anchored nearby. Proceed to quarantine doctor. Saw Statue of Liberty glowing in the sunlight. Bitterly cold wind, bright sunshine. Waited about until 12 – had hurried lunch. When at lunch a press man came to me and said ‘Mrs Griffiths, I am from the press. I have nothing to say, I said. Oh! Said he – we know your story of the Women of Wales Movement – but we want to [take some?] photos – will you come to the top deck when you have finished. Agreed said I. So Eluned & I trotted up to the top deck 1st class – where we found four [bank? Rank?] photographers awaiting us.

************************************************************************

Separated by a line from the rest of the text:

The Cedric took ten boats to push her up the river thro’ the ice’

*************************************************************************

There we were photographed quite twenty times – in different positions & back again to 2nd class to await the coming of the Immigration Officers. They came about 2 – before this we had gone on Deck & had seen Marg Ellis, Mrs Tuttle, Miss Belle Baunch & other American ladies who had come down to meet the deputation in the Customs Shed awaiting us. Eventually they got on board and there was much hand shaking & welcoming us. The ladies all wore daffodils –I had had the daffodil bouquet put in cold storage when I got on the Cedric & it was beautifully fresh for our arrival in New York, so I carried it in my hand and wore my best costume and hat to greet the American ladies.

We got through the Customs easily due to the kindness of Mrs Fairman [? – could be Mr] (a friend of Mrs Glynne Roberts & a Mr [?] 

 

Page 10 - 

 

friend of Mrs Thomas’ cousin’s husband - then we had the luggage put in a ? - the oak chest with the memorial forms _ over _ delivery - & we came up to the women’s university club in Mrs Laidlaw’s car which was decorated with daffodils. 

When we got here we were told our engagements - as made by Mary Ellis.

On the way up I gave Mary letters from various friends including one from her chief woman inspector Miss Walk prohibiting her as an H.N.I from taking part in the move - went _ _ _

Poor Mary was very upset at this. So were we all - it cast quite a gloom over the party. She has done such splendid spade work- no-one can ever estimate the value of her preliminary arrangements. 

(next page)

She has _ all round & has brought together so many strands & they have formed into one strong force of women to work for Peace -

We were due at 4.30 at Mrs Barmy (confusing - his wife was called Annie) Baruch’s house- whose husband was President Wilson’s right hand man at Versailles. They live in a perfectly wonderful house - luxuriously furnished with exotics lavishly decorating the rooms - A large crowd of people had been united to meet ‘Welsh Delegation’ - we were presented to one after another. _ Miss _ a charming- good-looking - very attractive woman - and Mrs Jones, Brooklyn relative of Mary Ellis. Mrs Roosevelt - 

Mrs - of Radioactivity - Mrs Bugbee of the New York _, Mrs Laidlaw & many more- also a gentleman of the Press.


 

Page 11

to whom I spoke freely and gave information as he desired.

A most delicious tea. Choice sandwiches & most delectable cakes “the best in New York” was a pistachio cake so Mrs Baunch told me.

We walked back here, then had dinner, Mary [?] Mrs Thomas & I – Eluned having gone to see a friend. After dinner we went to the Ambassador’s Hotel as Mary wanted to cable to Miss Walk [?]& I sent a cable to David. Back home & to bed. A very remarkable day. Rather a blizzard when we got to New York, but better weather towards evening.

The Club is very comfortable but very warm. Still one gets used to the warm atmosphere & dresses accordingly.

My impressions of the American women I have met today is that they are genuine & sincere in their efforts to give the Movement all the support they can. Their reception of us was so spontaneous so natural & without any of the side [?] & affectation of English women. They accepted us at our highest value, as Ambassadors of Peace. They did not quiz & criticise us first & gradually thaw.

 

Tuesday, Feb 12th

Got up fairly early & had a light breakfast. Grapefruit and tea & toast, wrote a few letters, and went out to get medicine for Mary Eliis who was not well. Rev. D. M. Richards called and was exceedingly kind.

Mrs Laidlaw called for us at 12.30 to take us to the luncheon of Historical Round Table of the Town Hall. This Round Table has been arranged to bring together those people who are interested in the Romance of the Founding & Growth of the City. We had a delightful lunch. I sat between Mrs Carr &  [?....Auda??] & a Mrs Prizotto [? Sic?], a Spanish or Portuguese Artist 

 

Page 12 

There were many very interesting people present. Henry Taft 0 G+ Pres Teft’s brother

Mike Theodore Douglas Robinson

Sister of G+ Pres Roosevelt and a prominent Republican leader, who read “oh captain, my captain”

Miss Elizabeth Marbury, a playwright (a 2ndMrs J M Jenkins) of the Democratic Party Women’s Chairman.

Mr Geo Haven Putman whose father was a great friend of Abe Lincoln. He gave his recollections of Lincoln’s first visit to New York. ….from. the first speech Lincoln made in New York. Neither let us be frightened from our _ for right makes right and let us _ our duties well understand it. Lincoln, Prof Barnoum, Professor at Columbia University “Little merit to be born”, great merit to give birth”.

Leave foot-prints on the lands of time, but no finger-prints for the policemen”.

Other speeches on Dutch citizens of New York.After luncheon was over, talked to many people, and were invited to another luncheon on Friday in the same place. A compliment to …. After being shown over the town hall and audit _, a beautiful room, Mrs Laidlaw drove us back here in her car. We found M. Ellis better but not fit to accompany us to tea.

 

Mrs Laidlaw called Carter? and took us in her car to Mrs Passous who lives in a beautiful apartment in 1155 Park Avenue.

Gorgeous place and hostess attired in full evening dress, a beautiful woman, in shimmering mauve and diamante.

 

Met a Miss Halfood who knows Russian inside out and who had translated the Church Service into that language. And this day her



 

Page 13

 translation had been used in a Church in N.Y. for the first time. A very critical caustic rather terrifying woman.

Then a long dissertation on Pitcairns Bible by Mr Laures [?] Mrs Parson’s father. Remarkable story of one of the Tahitian islands being governed by the Bible & all that was done by the people was done thro [sic.] the guidance of the teaching of this Bible.

Eluned, MrsThomas & I walked back all the way to the Club. Had dinner at Club. Eluned left & went to stay with friends. And Mary, Mrs Thomas and I stayed on.

 

Wednesday, Feb 13th 

Went out shopping with Mrs Thomas. She bought watch. Called at [Baltimore?] hotel & saw Mrs [Hodge?], arranged about oak chest to be sent there in time for Tuesday’s luncheon – also arranged to return on “Olympic” on March 22nd to Southampton. Walked up Fifth Avenue & admired array of beautiful things in shop windows.

Got on a bus and had a 10 cents ride along Riverside, on this beautiful sunny morning. Ground white with newly-fallen snow, river Hudson a sheet of ice [can’t read this sentence].

Then to Horace [Remi?] school & Training College& met Mary Elias outside. Heard a lesson on Appreciation of Music, to tiny tots of 6, 7 & 8. “To a Wild Rose” piece written by Ed [?] Mc Dowell – then looed thro’ various rooms saw children’s work. Then to the Cafetarea [sic] – helped ourselves to everything. Just took an aluminium tray, paper d’oyley spoons forks etc – chose food & proceeded [?? ??] table & had an excellent meal – from there we went over Colombia Library. Wonderful 

Page 14

building with dome of green & a huge white ball suspended as if in space.

Got on train & then had taxi & went to Mrs Croley’s to tea. She had gone to the poorer side of town (wife of Editor of New Republic) & had transformed old house into most delightful modern dwelling. Mr Croley, Ed of New Republic met among other interesting people, a Miss Mercer, a great & intimate friend of Mrs Russell Cooke. She was in the States on a lecturing tour & was going on to Washington to speak on personalities of politics. Very pretty house, decorated & planned by a Mrs Green whom we met at the house. 

Came home in Mrs Laidlaw’s car. Had dinner & walked to Waldorf Astoria. Saw Mr Roberts & Megane, they seemed miserable & wanted to leave their hotel.

We walked back & went into the Ambassadors Hotel & talked over the D.W.S. Headship Vacancy. Mary finally decided not to apply. Back to club to bed.

 

Thursday, Feb 14

Sat in library and wrote letters all morning. Made a fair copy of my speech for Tuesday’s luncheon. I had a letter from Peter, telling me that “the house is quiet & lonely without you.” Mary Ellis had a wire from Miss Walk re: Washington, telling her she could go, re re - ??

We three went to lunch I the Elm Tree – no go – very uninviting – thence to Cook’s to change money & on to Fifth Avenue to Consolidated Ticket Office. Got information re trip to West. Then we went to Women’s Citizen office & saw Miss Roderick & had a long talk with her about Memorial. From there to English Speaking Union Club where we met many

Page 15 

of our new friends & had a most hospitable reception. Mr Mrs  [??] [Daniels?] host & hostess. I met Mr Kennedy [??] of Woodbine Villa. Mr K is Editor of International Bulletin & arranged to call and see him at his office re an article for his paper. Said a few words re our visit met much kindness from all friends.

Left with Mrs Laidlaw in her car & Mrs Neal & her daughter Mrs Bower, & went to a Restaurant in Park Avenue (Ch  . . .??) [??] as Mrs Neal’s guests. We three Mary, Mrs Thomas & myself had a delicious beef steak dinner, beautifully cooked. Went in taxi with Mrs Neal & left her at her home & then came back here & wrote letters in Library – to Mrs Rathbone [??] Rowlands & Tom.

 

Friday, Feb 15th

Got ready early to go out, but held up by photographer who came from [Underwood?]. took photos of Mary Ellis and me together & singly. M. E. then left for the weekend to the Bigelows.

Mrs Thomas r/ went to Ambassadors Hotel & had our hairs shampooed (From there to Maddison Avenue where Mrs Thomas bought hat). Looked at shops & hurried back to Club & found Mrs Laidlaw had phoned telling us to come to the Town Hall in taxi – arrived there rather late – but were put to sit at table with the Misses Damrosche [?] & a lady with pearls like hazel nuts & a gentleman. This was a round table luncheon to Dr Damrosch, an act of appreciation Mrs [?] in the chair. Several speakers took part, & I was 

 

Page 16 - Missing

asked to speak - about my _ - I mentioned the link between Wales and music….the story of Theo Roosevelt and Rev D Richards about the perfect marriage between ‘O Fryniau Caersalem’ and the tune ‘Ola Derby’ asked for a perfect union bet: Wales and America for world peace will we produce a symphony 2nd to none. Composed by only living musicians.

From there we went to the ‘_ _ Society’ with Mrs Laidlaw who was one of the speakers. 

Anna _ Spencer was in the chair.

(next page)

Mrs Laidlaw spoke with great verve and directness, urging the women to bombard their senators with letters on the peace question - asked them to vote on the __ _ Then I was asked to speak without any warning - spoke of what had been done in Wales & asked them to do what they could in America for peace.

Came back from there in Mrs Laidlaw’s car and went to a club meeting, an address on Russia rather dull. Had tea & Mrs William Hughes called to see us with Mr Hughes - very genial and pleasant - went to see Mrs Hughes in the car - promised to go there to dinner on Sunday.

At 6.30 went with _ to Mrs Laidlaw’s house - had a delicious dinner - fruit - turkey - salad - rice pudding coffee - a young Russian there, & her young daughter & Mr Laidlaw.


 

Page 17 - Missing

 

Page 18

Sunday Feb 17th

Went in morning to hear Rev. H.E. Fosdick [?] preach – Eccles: 9.2 Rom: 8.28. Author of Eccles full of cynicism; full of pessimism, God afar off. Nature unknown immortality [?] an idle dream. All comes alike to all. Paul dealing with same fact but Christ has come back ‘[?]’ of eternal life.how like but how different the result. The sinner – the Saint.

It is not what life brings to us in her [?] but what we bring to life with our spirit. That makes.[?].Which of these two roads are we to keep [?]? Experience  [?] hope “Does it do that today?”

Paul’s experience was so varied. Still he said “all things work together for good”. Learn secret of Paul’s life: Elements that [?] into Paul’s conviction –

1) The impartiality of Nature cannot trace  . . . to  . . . .

2) All things do not come alike to all – Does death come alike to all?

Mount Vernon. Washington’s House – “let me die the death of the righteous”. Clean trouble. We are not to blame for trouble complicated by si – unclean trouble. Woodrow Wilson’s death – respected by all memory of righteous is blessed – see [???].

After service Mr W. M. Hughes met us in his car & drove us towards his home at 945 West End Avenue New York, but on the way the car broke down so we proceeded by taxi.

When we got there we found Mrs Hughes gracious and smiling & we had a most delicious dinner grapefruit, grilled chicken lovely potatoes, peas, onions & pineapple & apple tart & tea – too stiff to move after it. Had an interesting talk with Mrs Hughes, who mapped our itinerary to San Francisco & back [????] helped us [hugely? Largely?] later.

Then in a taxi to Rev D M Richards’s house for tea- had tea there & went to evening service at Welsh chapel. A Mr Rees of .. . .

 

Page 19 

 

Scranton preached. Then in time after meeting, I said a few words. Back _ Mrs Hughes, with Alison to Mrs Hughes’s for supper thence to club driving in Mr. Mrs Alison’s taxi to the door.

 

Monday Feb18th. Went to Fifth Avenue & did some shopping then to see Mr Blackwell and had some talk with him - then to see Mr. Fairman of the London Scottish Midland Railway who most kindly undertook to get our tickets for the grand tour to California & back - & we were able to say exactly what we wanted to do. Had lunch at Fifth Avenue Rest. then tried to find Mr Kennedy whom I had promised to see about International Bulletin - failed to find him I had wrong address.

Back to club. found Mary had returned - Miss Barruck rang up had to go down to office of League of Women Voters to read over speech for Radio live.

Back had tea, then had dinner with Mrs Meshlloch ?? , a friend of Mrs Garneti - greatly enjoyed the evening.

 

Tuesday. Telephoning & much excitement. To Bank to get money for tickets - Changed £80 into dollars. Paid 239.54 dollars for round trip to California & back including sleepers _. The back to hotel got dressed for the Luncheon which was timed to begin at 1pm at Biltmore Hotel - Rather nervous about my speech - Got there in fair time in Mrs Laidlaw’s car & met many people. Was photographed with the other three & Mrs Laidlaw, Mrs Ruth Morgan & Mrs Tuttle  by the chest in the reception room. Went into the Dining Hall - The Cascade - & sat on Miss Ruth Morgan’s right-hand at the guest table.


 

Page 20

After the luncheon we had speeches. Mrs Ruth Morgan introduced the delegation - & I gave them an address on the links that bind Wales & America together, & our act of memorial. It seemed to be appreciated. Then we three went up to the chest which had been placed on a dais & padlocks were unlocked, & we gave [up?] the padlocks & the memorial to Mrs Ruth Morgan. Then the chest was inspected and the first question I was asked concering it was “Oes yma enwau o Sir Feirionydd” –Miss Sue [?] Harvard sang [Gwlad y Delyn?? &] Hen Wlad fy Nhadau & thus ended one chapter in the history of the Memorial. It was a truly thrilling gathering and one which in our wildest flights of imagination, we had never thought of on such a comprehensive scale.

 

Empty page - possibly press clipping fallen out? 

 

Page 21

Went along to 200 Fifth Avenue to see Mr Fairman (the same man who met them off the ship, I think – still can’t read his name!) to pay for our tickets, the back to Club in a taxi. Had tea there, and a talk with 2 German ladies who were great pacifists.

 

Page 22

That evening Mrs Baunch called me at the Club in her car, & she and M.E. & I went as [as far?] as a Hall & I broadcasted my address. [?] stayed in an adjoining room & said I did it well.

Back to the Club had dinner & packed in readiness for our departure on the morrow.

 

Wednesday Feb 20th

Just on 8am Mr Fairman rang me up, said as it was such a blizzard he would [?] bring the tickets up to the Club instead of our going down to fetch them. As he was so kind we finished breakfast & packing and waited for him. He came about 10 & advised us to go along at once in the taxi he had come up in. This we did & got down to the Penn Rail Road at 11 a.m. We left our trunks at the Club until our return. He did everything possible for us for our comfort – getting us papers, giving us coffee & establishing the [uncle? Lunch? ?? privilege” with Mary & Galdys & a brotherhood system with Annie. Introduced a Mr Gordon to us Supt [superintendent] of some Dept on the railway. Got on the 12.10 train for Washington – had lunch on the train – passed thro’ Baltimore, Philadelphia & other places. An un-interesting journey. Except for the two rivers that we crossed, houses all detached & wide acres of [??] flat country partly covered by snow. Had a comfortable journey.

Met at Washington station by Mrs Eastman & her car - & drove to the American Assoc: of University Women’s Club. 1634 [??] Street N. W. [?] where rooms had been reserved for us. Mrs T & I had adjoining rooms with bathroom between. Arrived here about 6 – had to get dressed immediately for the  . . .

 

Page 23 - Missing

dinner which was given in our honour at the club.

Dinner at 7.p.m. - about 100 guests present. Mr Raymond Morgan in the chair - almost efficient chairman.

After dinner speeches . ‘Three wise women from the East’. My address given in New York. Mary lead memorial and _  gave a short address.

Much appreciation given to what we had done & said & many arrangements for our ……………………Several BWIA women who were very cordial & effusive also _ _ _ ……who invited me to dinner at his house the next evening - He had in his pocket a letter from Prof Webster with a sentence about me & my tact & manner k k. Went to bedroom and copied out article written for South WalesDaily News - had good night’s sleep.

 

Thursday Feb 21st

Had breakfast together, grape fruit, wheat cakes, syrup & tea. At 10.a.m. Mrs Stowell came around to fetch us to show us the sights of Washington. Took a taxi and went passed Red Cross Buildings! Got out at Pan-American building a beautiful pile -

From there passed White House & Library of Congress- wonderful marble pillars of Baltimore marble brought there and put up by a Welshman , David Evans of Baltimore.

Went to find Mr. David Roberts - the librarian in the Fine Art section (Dafydd Gach) - his eisteddfodic name - he showed us round & showed us many treasures - The Copy of Declaration of Independence,

 

3. Washington

 

Page 24

Lincoln’s Great speech in his own handwriting, portraits of the senators [etc?], the book stacks, which have 210 miles of shelving, the arrangements for sending the books to the readers [etc etc? ]. A most magnificent building. From there we drove to the office of the League of Women Voters, where we were photographed. Then in charge of Mrs Morgan & Mrs Swiggelt we all walked across to White House for an interview with President Coolidge. On entering we found the hall filled with people, reporters, photographers & others. We saw a man in charge – in plain clothes –no uniform here . . .We saw on his list of President’s Engagements for the day Feb 21st 1924: 12.15 – Mrs Hughes-Griffiths, Mrs Mary Ellis and Miss Pryce – we were shown into another room & waited there awhile with several other people, while the President’s secretary came out. Mr [Sterns??] by name.

He opened the door leading into the room where Mr Coolidge stood standing, awaiting our arrival - & we were introduced to him by Mrs Morgan.

He aid words to this effect “ You are from Wales”.

I: Yes

He: And I have Welsh blood in my veins, having for an ancestor Nathaniel Davies. So you can’t get away from home.

I: We are proud to own you as a [???]

He: Thank you, I am very glad to see you.

I: Producing the copy of the Memorial & showing it to him together with photograph of oak chest. “This is the copy 

Page 25

of the memorial we have brought over from Women of Wales to W. of Am & the chest containing the signatures etc – We hope you will allow the chest to be placed in the Smithsonian Institute for all time –

He: I will do what I can to help you. I do not see what reason there is for it not to be placed there  - I was the President of the Institue etc etc.

 

We then left the room, after being cordially pleasantly welcomed by the President, a quiet dignified man of middle height. Straight nose with the crease in his trousers a pleasant manner and voice. We went outside the White House & were besieged by an army of photographers – 9 in all. Were taken many many times. Shots have reached us this evening which are exceedingly good.

From there we went back to the club – Had lunch with Mrs Morgan, Miss Sebane [?] & Miss Eastman.

 

Then at 2pm we called round to see Mr Secretary Hughes. He came out of his room to see & welcome us – ‘smug’ is the word to describe him – he was pleasant but condescending & had very little to say to us.

 

From there we went back to League of Women’s Voters’ rooms & then Mrs Abrahams took us in a taxi to the House of Representatives and the Senate House. We sat in both places for a short while & heard debates in both places in the former on a Corporation bill, in the latter on some Agricultural [??] in a particular state. After this we had tea & then Mr Stowell came fr us in his car & we were driven round and up to the Washington memorial – a huge tower straight and erect. 

Page 26

Begun in 1848 & completed in 1884. Stones from all contries of the world are to be found in it.

 

Thence to the Lincoln Memorial a most beautiful marble temple with a huge statue of Lincoln seated inside by a sculptor by the name of French. The architect, Bacon (?) died last Sunday. This cost about 12,000,000 dollars paid by Congress.

Then we drove into the city round the zoological gardens & back past Mr Woodrow Wilson’s house to the club – the others went out to Mr and Mrs Stowell’s for dinner. I came in to dress, as I was going to …..’s for dinner. He soon came to fetch me in his car & we called for Mrs Bernard [?], I found Mr and Mrs Percy?......staying here. Had a very nice dinner & talked of the Websters, of the trip to San Francisco & many other things.

Had note from Peter McKay for Theatre in San Francisco. Drove back to Club with Mrs Bernard – a very charming woman.

 

Friday Feb 21st 1924

Mrs Eastman arrived at 9 a.m. in her car, & we started for Arlington[5], a place about 4 miles from Washington, where sleep the silent hosts who died in the war for the Union.

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Then we drove back past the Lincoln Memorial[6] where Eluned took some photos. From here we went to the Photographers who took our photos outside White House. I ordered some large ones & post cards. Thence to Washington Cathedral[7] where we saw Woodrow Wilson’s tomb with the simple inscription

Woodrow Wilson

1856-1924

A beautiful building in process of building – the money to be procured before continuing to build. From there back to Club lunch – where we were entertained by the alumni of Radcliffe College[8], the female part of Harvard University. Made a short speech after lunch. Mrs Doyle presided.

From there went to Miss Croft’s (Miss  Kerr’s assistant). Car to Smithsonian Institute where we decided!! on a spot where the oak chest should be placed. Had very jolly drive – back to Club. Thence to Mr. & Mrs. La Follette’s[9] – a Senator likely to be new President & lead new party a very nice couple. Geo. Washington Day[10]cherry favour – large crowd Senators’ ladies standing in a row receiving the said. The best part of this house was the great sympathy with Peace movement – we are all interested in it but we have different ways of setting about it.

Very kind to us. Both of them whitehaired old couple very charming in manner. Went to station with Mr. Ellis ???. Saw them off. Walked to Club, bought oranges & went to Geo. Washington meeting in Memorial Hall[11].

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George Washington anniversary meeting

 

Saturday Feb. 22. 1924

Black lady on train. Manicurist. “You come from London? You speak very good English”.

Paper bags for hats – packed our things. 

 

Mrs. Morgan came to bid us goodbye, her last message being as follows –

“Our organisation, the National Council for Prevention of War[12], is trying to do one definite thing & is arranging an active Campaign to attempt to secure the sanction of the Senate for entrance into the Permanent Court of International Justice[13]. Your visit to us has awakened a great deal of fresh interest, & will help our campaign forward greatly, for the success of such a campaign depends entirely upon popular interest, & your message to us has added that touch of drama which is necessary to arouse that interest.”

 

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Sunday - 9.a.m. Feb. 24th

Washington is very different from New York - in atmosphere and outlook - it is the political centre - & has none of the commercial & business aroma that one smelt round every corner in New York.

 

Chicago

 

We left Washington the White City at 11.45, & journeyed towards Chicago, in our section. At Harrisburg we removed to a compartment in paying 3.50 dollars each extra. We had a comfortable journey via Pittsburgh, where Mrs Mina Kerr got on the train. We had a nice talk together - she being on her way to attend a Conference of Deans of Women's Colleges which was nearby in Chicago Feb. 25-29th, at the Blackstone Hotel[14]. At Englewood Station[15] Chicago David met us, in a motor car. We apologized to David for bringing him out so early - why he said you [could] have come 5 hours earlier on such an occasion if necessary. Drove to 4933 Dorchester Avenue where Abbie gave us a great welcome, a beautiful breakfast being ready for us. Spotless linen. Fruit, sausages, buttered toast, & most delicious tea ??.

 

After breakfast & a wash, we had a nice talk, & in the afternoon David took us over the Museum - a splendid pile of buildings - visited many sections of it, & went on to the University Club[16] to dinner - huge slices of beef.

Home in motor car - & to bed – dead tired – had letters & news papers.

 

Monday Feb 25th

Had good night. David left at 8.45, as is his custom for the Museum. Abbie, Mrs. T. & I went to Marshall Field's[17] to meet Lois Poole at 12.30 for lunch. A tremendous conglomeration of food - but we enjoyed it - & then Abbie went home, and Lois, Mrs. Thomas 

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and I went to the Ten Commandments Picture Show[18] - then Mrs T. & I went back to 4933, & David came in and we had dinner at 7.p.m. at home. Mr. Rees the Druid called for an interview & information re. our visit - which I gave him.

 

Tuesday Feb 26th

David left as usual. Wrote letters galore. To lunch at University Club as guests of Mrs. Poole - Abbie's sister in law. Lois also there. Most elaborate luncheon, which I enjoyed. We three drove home in Mrs. Poole's car, & I went straight to bed, as I was not feeling very well. Slept for 2 hours, awoke refreshed. Got dressed for dinner at Blackstone Hotel, to which Mrs. Thomas & I had been invited to meet the Deans of Women's Colleges by Mrs. Kerr. Got there in a car ordered by David & arrived in good time. Got to the 2nd floor where the guests, about 400 women were assembled - & got into the most awful Babel of voices it has ever been my lot to hear.

 

Was introduced to several ladies but never caught the name of one as the noise was so great. Neither did Mrs. Thomas. Abbie had got a bouquet of lovely sweetpeas each for Mrs. T & me -  & we looked so swish. Went into the Ballroom for dinner - sat on Miss Root's, the President's right hand, & on Miss Kerr's left. One gentleman present, Prof. Merriam[19] of Chicago University. A Dr. Wells[20], a woman of great distinction & President of the Assoc. of Women Deans, gave her report; then Frau Schreibe[21] gave an account of the need for brotherhood, being 

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one of 35 members of the Reichstag 15 of which were school teachers. Then I was called upon to speak of the Memorial, did so for 15 minutes, being time allotted. Met Miss Hurlbate of Cardiff. Deans - ??? ???.

Got home by 10.30. Very glad the ordeal was over. Mrs. Thomas said I did allright.

 

Wednesday Feb. 27th

David went off as usual. I wrote article for S. W. Daily News[22] about our visit to Washington. Then we drove all the way down to Marshall Field's to lunch, then took a car & drove past the Hotel where Lloyd George stayed. & on to Lincoln Park[23]. Saw statues of General Grant & Lincoln (a replica of which stands outside Westminster Abbey back home. Had tea. Then David came in, & we went to the Kenwood Hotel[24] a short distance away for Dinner. Drove there & back - tho' only a very short distance. Back & had a very happy evening.

 

Thursday Feb. 28th & Friday 29th

David left as usual. Wrote all morning. Sent articles to S. W. Daily News, Brython Cymraeg[25]. Packed up & left part of luggage in 4933 Dor. Ave. Had lunch at home, & at 5.30 left by car with luggage for Blackstone Hotel, where we met David, who had arranged a very rich & sumptuous dinner for ua. He had also booked a compartment for us as far as Salt Lake City. We went to the Station at 7.30 & Abbie gave us a beautiful basket of fruit, lots of nuts & sweets, & they came to 

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see us off.

We got comfortably settled in & slept in B. ???.

 

4. Salt Lake City

 

During the night we passed thro' the States of Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, touching a corner of Colorado at Julesburg, back to Nebraska. Crossed the Missouri River at Omaha. The country we passed thro' today is one large tract of grazing land, with homesteads pitched at long distances from each other, & then in groups. Large herd of red cattle, & red brown hogs. Brown chickens. Artesian wells everywhere. Telephone wires everywhere. The ground a light brown colour, not a trace of green anywhere. Saw a removing of furniture on the road - 5 large carts crowded with all sorts of furniture, drawn by a pair of strong horses. Ford cars in every shape & form, clean & dirty - everywhere.

 

No platforms at the stations; roads run across the rails, danger signals up, but very dangerous. Low undulating hills in the distance. Elevation varying from Chicago 590 ft up, Omaha, 1033 feet, Julesburg 3467 ft., to Sherman 8013 ft: highest point on route, which we are due to reach about 10.30.p.m. Must now put writing aside for night.

Read Tale of Triona[26] by W.J. Locke.

 

Saturday Mar. 1st

Got up by 7.a.m. to see the Coal ??? Rock Springs & Green River Stations[27] which we passed bet. 7 & 8.a.m. Then on to ??? by 11.a.m. & entered State of Utah.

 

We now got to the Land of Canyons[28]

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Most wonderfully formed rocks of bright red colour. Most wonderful formation. Sphynx like in shape, formidable in appearance. See p.p.c - through a station called Morgan, quite the most well-kept station on the road[29]. Morgan written in white stones on the station level. We saw in passing one only little church and adjoining a ??? ??? church right away by itself.

 

We were surprised that we saw so few churches & school. We reached Ogden at 1.5.pm & after putting our packages in the Left Luggage Office, we hired a car & hied us to the Ogden Canyon[30], a distance of 11 miles. 

 

Our drive was an exceedingly well set up young man in knee breeches & in passing thro the town called at his garage for his overcoat & splendid crown & yellow check coat. We drove up through the ravine or pass or canyon, thro’ snow covered rocks & hills, with here & there the hot steam appearing from the hot water springs higher up. Then passed the country houses of the Ogden rich folks, who migrate to these parts as soon as the hot weather comes. 

 

There was one particularly well built & attractive bungalow or chalet, & a large hotel – the Hermitage Hotel. We drove as far as the Artesian Wells from whence Ogden gets her water supply & saw the water coming out in a constant flow. From there we drove on to the Fish Hatcheries – but 2 miles from there we failed to get any further as the road was impassable, on a/c of melting snows. Back to Ogden, & we were informed that a 2nd cousin of Lloyd George lived in the town, a Miss Bradley. We paid 4½ dollars for our trip & dismissed our car.

 

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[NOTE AT TOP OF PAGE: Feature of landscape the wonderful reds & yellow of willow trees, & greys of cottonwood tree.

 

Had tea at a nice Restaurant, a very good tea. We walked to station ??? p.p.c.’s on route. Left Ogden by the 5.10 train – very hot & stuffy. Got to Salt Lake City soon after 6.p.m. & found that Mr. John Hughes the Depot Master was at the other station, the Rio Grande & Denver – we met a Y.W.C.A Lady Traveller’s Aid - & she telephoned to the Y.W.C.A. & we got a taxi & drove up, some distance away. When we got there my companion was dubious, but I went in, saw bedroom, & as it was quite a nice large one two beds, two windows I took it. We paid 75 cents each for room & paid in advance. We then went out to the Utah Hotel & had some supper in the Cafetaria down below the Hotel. We walked home thro’ a Saturday night crowd, & were not much impressed with the place, had telephoned from hotel to Mr. Tom Hughes the Depot-master, but we were told he was “at large”.

Went to bed immediately upon return & slept soundly until 6.a.m. next morning.

 

P27

Sunday, March 2nd 1924

Woke at 6 a.m., had bath at 7. Read several Chapters of Acts. Then dressed, and at 9 a.m. we left the Y.W.C.A. in a taxi, taking our luggage with us and putting it in the Left Luggage Office of the Union Pacific Station.

We then walked thro’ the large Depot Hall with large frescos of the arrival of Brigham Young[i] and the Early settlers in Salt Lake City. I then tho’t I would telephone to our friend the Station Master – he came to the phone, and suggested we should go to see him – just three blocks away. So we went and in the station hall I went up to a short

 

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dapper little man of some 60 odd years – and asked him if he knew where I could find Mr Hughes. I am the man. Then he asked if we were the ladies who had telephoned him – He then asked us if we had had breakfast. We had had some fruit in our room – Abbie’s gift to us both. So we said “No – he then took us to the station buffet where we sat on high stools. Had grapefruit, bacon and griddle cakes too. He insisted upon paying for them. He then went and phoned to some Welsh people. Mr James the British Vice Consul and a Mr Low, Mr Williams an St Senator. I was then called to the phone and had a talk with Mr James who told me we ought to have been at the St David’s Day Celebrations the previous evening and how much he wanted to see us, take (?) how we ought to tell our message to the women of Utah. He then spoke to Mr Hughes. Eventually it was arranged that we two were to go as far as the Mormon Temple grounds, sign our name in the visitors’ book and wait until the two Welshmen, James and Williams arrived. We took a car as far as the Temple and looked round it. Soon Mr Williams a Welshman from Brechfa Carmarthenshire, the St Senator, arrived with his wife and son, in a fine motorcar. We were standing in the grounds when I saw him. I went up to him and said “Mr Williams”. He said yes. Then he took us to his wife and she said when my husband spoke to you I tho’t you must be some Salt Lake City acquaintances of his, you looked so American! We then went to the Tabernacle, we got there and heard the great organ played, and a discourse given upon

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Mormons here by a young lawyer who mother is Welsh. We had to leave before his end as Mr James wanted us to see some of the city.

We were photographed outside the Temple in the wonderful sunlight and then made our way to the motorcar, the automobile. I had to tell the W.O.W. story to Mr James, and we went as far as the University on the hill where one had a most splendid view of the city beneath the clearly cut snow clad mountains, like white icing so smooth and straight in appearance – a fine mist rising from the Lake in the distance was a most impressive picture. From there we went to Mr Williams home 1401 Sigsbee Avenue. A very nice home – where we had a very

Welcome cup of tea – we then got into the car and drove past and round the Capitol. The highest point of the city – another fine building. Down to the town under the Eagle Bridge. The old toll gate of the city and to the Station –

Getting our luggage out. We got on to the rails – there are no platforms in America. I got our luggage on board – then we were photographed, alone, and in a group and we started off at 12.55 for San Francisco.

Mr John James, British Vice-Consul, a native of Swansea, born in Haverfordwest, his father being Police Constable living in the Castle, has married an English American lady who was Welsh by adoption – had four children – a very pleasant kind man., who was a keen patriot and who was so very regretful that we had not been at the St David’s Day celebration last evening. He writes for the Draid (?) and had a long story to

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tell of our visit. He said how very disappointed the Salt Lake City Welsh people were because Mr Lloyd George had not been able to go as far as S.L. City. We felt very grateful to Mr Tom (?) Hughes who is a cousin of Mr John Hughes Rhodesia R (?) for introducing us to the kind friends who added so much to our pleasure during the few hours we spent in S.L. City.

I asked Mr Hughes why they had railroads across the streets and no fences along the lines. “As I figure it out, he said, I guess it is cheaper to pay for killing a calf or a ram than to pay for putting up fences”

 

Mr James who is of the Mormon persuasion asked us to say at home that the separation the Mormons have in England is not deserved and that they were a good living people.

Leaving there in good spirits we soon reached Ogden where we were hitched on to the Chicago train – for San Francisco. Crossing the Lake by rail – 30 miles of viaduct, a most wonderful achievement – we had beautiful views of the snow clad mountains around S.L. City – and for a long time they stood out in the landscape as the outstanding feature. After crossing the lake we passed through miles and miles of sandy desert. Yellow sand everywhere with tufts of scrubby growth and a plant in appearance like tamarisk – we have just had Dinner on the train and the beds are being prepared for night, our first experience of a Pullman car, pure and simple.

 

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San Francisco

Monday March 3rd

Got up after a poor night’s rest. 48 people sleeping in long deckers far too crowded…Found ourselves in California, the hills, the Nevada Range, covered with snow – a most beautiful sight, the white hill, the green fir trees rising in her upon tier (?) from the valleys up to the horizon. After breakfast at which we spoke to Mr Cheney and Miss Murdoch of Berkeley University – I went and sat in the observation car and had a talk with Miss Murdoch. The scenery changed rapidly, soon leaving the snow covered hills as we came down down to the valleys – soon I caught sight of an almond tree in blossom outside a tiny house called Cape Horn. Most gorgeous pink – then more and more blossom appeared – some prune and cherry and apple -

 

Miles and miles of orchards – adjoining the railway – but too early for the blossom. Very beautiful scenery. Soon we reached Sacramento, the capital of California and then on past Berkeley – where the State University stands, to Oakland, where we all got off the train and got on board the Santa Clara, the S. Pacific boat which plies between the mainland and San Francisco. A delightfully sunny day, bay quite calm, got to San Fran safely and took taxi to Ramona Hotel – had double bedded room and bath – 4 dollars a night for two – and got our things out went out and had a good tea – Salmon steaks and tea excellent – then to call at Whitcomb Hotel to see if any letters had been sent there – phoned to David Hughes – on the San Fran Chronicle – who said he would call at Hotel about 8. Went to some movie show and back to hotel by 7.35. At 8, Mr and Mrs D Hughes and Mr and Mrs PJ Roberts called and we had a

 

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Very nice talk with them – going out about 10 pm for a walk through China town – and walked through some of the Chinese shops and admired their goods.

Back to Ellis Street, to a Café and had waffles and maple syrup all of us tout ensemble –

Mr Hughes made us promise to stay in San Fran until the following Saturday Nov 8 (we had arranged to leave on Friday the 7th) as his Welsh Church wanted to give us a Reception – we agreed to do this. Back to hotel and had good night’s rest.

Boat and Train

 

Tuesday March 4 1924

Mr and Mrs Roberts called about 10 a.m. and we went to the San Francisco’s Chronicle office where I was interviewed by a young lady in brown – who was (? very superior).  However I talked (??)  to her, and finally she asked me to go up with her to the studio, so as to have my picture taken. This was done – I then re-joined the others downstairs and we went round some of the shops, back to the Robertses apartment where we had a nice lunch and a great (? Croesawu)

After lunch we started sightseeing in their car, a beautiful 7 seater – and went through GoldenGate Park – where there are flowers trees and shrubs from every clime in the world. We saw the Stadium and Bandstand where there is a natural awning over the seats of weeping willows, all kept beautifully pruned.

 

Page 40

Aquarium

Japanese Tea Garden – Museum Art Gallery and many groups of Statuary – one “The Thinker” by Rodin – by which we were snapped – we then drove along the Ocean Boulevard, from which we had a fine view of the Pacific Ocean. Driving on through the Presidio, the largest – military Station in the USA including officers’ quarters, barracks hospitals, post office  – From there we went up to the top of Lincoln Park – the Western terminus of the Lincoln Highway with monument to announce the fact. Following on we went up to Twin Peaks – which stood 900 feet about the site – the trip to the peaks is made over the world famous figures 8 drive – from there we drove down to the City, to call upon a (? Mrs Easton) a peace worker with whom I had an appointment at 5 pm – saw her. 

 

She works for President Coolidge’s return and does so as he is in favour of peace – had a nice talk with her, and met a Miss O’Hara afterwards. A breezy Irish woman who took down every word I said as quick as lightning on a type writer. Back to the hotel and about 7.30, we went with Mr and Mrs Roberts to call upon Mr and Mrs D. Hughes. M Hughes is a brother of (???) and is very active with the Welsh (?actors) in San Fran. Got back here, tired and very weary and to bed.

 

At the Museum we saw a kind of silver shield. Found and presented to the late King Edward who was Price of Wales in 18? (Annie questions this date) by the south Wales Counties – presented to the Museum by a Dr ….. in San Fran who gave it on condition that the facts concerning his possession of it

 

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should not be made public; until one year after his death. That time has just expired and Hughes was going to get the information.

 

Wednesday

Mr and Mrs Roberts met us outside out hotel soon after 9 and we started for a most wonderful drive – through the Park route, San Gregorio, passing acres of artichoke fields – on to Half Moon Bay – on the most wonderful scenic road imaginable – up and down, winding in and out the hills covered with growth – until we got almost to the highest point where we had a nice al fresco lunch prepared by Mrs Roberts. Then on to San Marco and on to Palo Alto which is situated in the Santa Clara valley – famous for its enormous

Fruit production. Half the prunes grown in the world come from this fertile spot. Unfortunately, we were too early for the blossom, which is very beautiful long stems covered with thick white blossom. So closely packed together like one big ?? of white flax. No other county in America produces so many cherries, or so many apricots.

 Has a wonderful chapel but too highly coloured for my taste andWe drove on to Stanford University which stands in its own grounds of 8000 acres. The buildings are of buff sandstone and they are grouped around open courts or quadrangles and are connected by continuous open arcades of arches and pillars. The no. of students at present is about 2500 – 2000 men and 500 women. 

Missing last paragraph

 

Page 42 

Called upon Mrs Tatlock, wife of Prof. of English Philosophy – sister of Mrs Bernard who we met in Washington. She took us round and showed us different buildings –

Drove back comfortably, a lovely drive and got a hotel between 5 and 6, had tea and took tickets for the Covered Wagon film – Soon after 7.30, was rung up by a Miss Gwendolen Evans – a Character – neurotic – hysterical, draws long bow regardless of everything and everybody – very anxious to see me – knew Tom – from St Asaph – widow of Cons Minister, first woman in Wales to be ordained for the Ministry, lost her husband in Los Angeles running a bench store on Geary (?) 6/34 – Arranged to see her next evening and dine with her.

Went to see Covered Wagon – came out at half time – back to hotel and Gwilym Owen called. Talked to him for one hour. Very nice young man. Claudia Owen’s brother – an architect – friend of Garmon Jones – nephew of Morris Caersars (?).

 

Friday March 6th 1924

Missing entry for March 6th across both pages 42 and 43.

 

Page 43

Saturday March 7th 1924

Shopped in the morning; spent too much money. Back about 1:00 p.m. Tired, but found that Mrs. William Owen had called. Then a Mr. John reporter called and asked for an interview; and Miss Morgan from Brecon – a friend of Mrs. Evans - also called.

Rested for a time and then got dressed. Prepared address for this evening meeting. Started for Mrs. Evans about 4:30. Had a meal there; also Miss Morgan there, and then to 610 Hyde street to Mrs. Roberts by 7:00 p.m. We drove from home in their car to call upon the Reverend Jones Minister of Welsh church. He was up and better but still far from well. We saw reverend Williams of Oaklands the brother of TH Williams Wilton Sq

 

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We then went on to the chapel to the reception and had a very nice gathering. Mr. Salisbury Williams from the harbour commission Presided, and there was singing and recitations and speeches

 

I spoke for about 20 minutes and at close of meeting met Mr. And Mrs. Dunn. Mrs. Dunn is an old Aber student from Pontypool, knew me in Aber. Has been out in S F  Since August. Very homesick when I spoke to her. Met many people who knew Sara. Got back to hotel midnight. Packed and went to bed by 1:00 a.m. Very tired.

 

Saturday March 8th 

 

Called up at 6:30 and by 7:15 a.m. mrs PJ Roberts - whose kindness has been beyond praise - and Mr. Samuel Jones, called for us in their car and drove us to the station where we took the train for Los Angeles.

Leaving San Fran at 7:45 a.m. Mr. D Hughes arrived just before the train left, and asked me to write down a bit of what I said last night for him.

A glorious day to come out, bright and Sunny. We travelled on the observation car until 4.30, when we went to the dining car for a meal. Had fried fish, fruit salad and Tea.  Have passed through groves of fruit trees.

 

5. Los Angeles

 

Got to Los Angeles by 8:30 p.m. Reverent Mr. Jones minister of the...

 

Page 45…Welsh chapel met us in his car - a Buick. Also Reverend & Mrs. John Davis late of Skirland, the few of Utica,  And drove us to the Gates Hotel where we had engaged a Room.

 

Almost as soon as I got into the hotel a lady accosted me being anxious to have an interview with me for the Los Angeles Times. I sat and and talked with her and told her of our message and of our visit to the Presidents Tomb in Washington. The interview appeared in Monday's paper, quite a nice article.

 

After she left, Reverend Doctor Jones had me promise to speak on Sunday evening at his church. I consented - though somewhat reluctantly.

We went to bed very tired, but I slept well - very comfortable bed. Got up on…

 

Sunday AM (9th)

… and went out to breakfast at Savoy hotel then walked to chapel. Doctor Jones preached a sermon on peace and mentioned me and my message. I announced that I was to speak in the evening service. Went back to the Gates Hotel for lunch. After 2:00 p.m. Mrs. Williams, whom Sara knew as Kathryn Evans, and her sister Mrs. Morgan came round in their car. Took us out.

We went first of all to Evergreen cemetery to see JM Saunders’ grave. I put some lovely white Chrysanthemums on the grave. “A servant of Jesus Christ” was the full inscription on the stone with his homes and dates appeared. From here we went to Alhambra - Ian Gabriel mission. Then I called at Huntingdon to hotel see Mr Ayres a friend of David. He was out.

Then through South Pasadena to 212 Brauch street and tea with Mrs. Williams and her husband - Mr. Morgan and their husband joining us.

 

Page 46

All of us drove down to chapel in the car. Chapel crowded. Mr. Jones’s son commenced the service very earnestly and prayerfully. Doctor John Davis introduced me by questioning Sara and John Saunders, and brother john & myself. I then spoke for 40 minutes - without one note! - of our mission.  Mrs Williams drove us back to the hotel, and we went straight up to bed.

 

Monday morning March 11th

Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Morgan were in the hotel before 9:00 a.m. Went to office to get reservations and then drove to Hollywood went to West Coast Production studio, to Beverly Hills Hotel where they were shooting pictures in the garden. Then Santa Monica Ocean Park, Venice, where we went to a Chinese restaurant. Had Chow Mein and Tea in the Chinese-style. I didn't enjoy it.

Then back to Los Angeles via Wilshire Boulevard to Gates Hotel, we went in and rested then took a taxi to American Express - as Mrs. Thomas wanted to change a cheque. Had tea at Bow Cafeteria soon after 4:00 p.m. Doctor Jones came round in his car to fetch us, Reverend & Mrs. John Davis. We drove to Long Beach about 20 miles distant and passed several very large oil Wells which had proved of immense value to their owners. Had a male at a russian cafeteria.

Grove to call upon the a Mr. Hughes of Denver (whom Peter knew) he was out, saw his daughter full of 18. After saying good-bye we drove back-to the gates hotel a distance of about 20 miles

--------

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Tuesday March 12th 1924

Left Los Angeles by 11:00 a.m. train. Mrs. Williams and Mrs. Morgan got their car to take us to the station revenues as John Davis this is Daniel James Mr. And Mrs. Johns reverent D Jones and the 2 ladies alone saw us off. A letter was handed to me as I left station - an anonymous letter telling us to get out of the States.

We journeyed through California state all the day-and reached Williams the Junction for the Grand Canyon early-on...

 

Grand Canyon

Wednesday morning (March 13th)

Got off the train at Grand Canyon and went to the Hotel El Forar for breakfast, a splendid meal. We then but tales for motor trips one round hermit rim and another after lunch in the other direction the Grand Canyon is beyond description in formation colour and effect 

We went to a Morie Lecture  Given by 2:00 brothers called cold who had travelled through the Canyon from Colorado river right through the Gulf of Mexico a distance of 217 miles.

We saw pictures of their wonderful experiences in 2 flat bottomed boats and the many escapades they injured and narrow escapes they had. We then went over to Hope house (the Indian centre) and saw the Indians dance  And shook hands with the chief. Who had a University training. He told us he had already 4 wives but he was still on the market. We walked a dozen to the station, only a few yards by 7:00 p.m. - got on the train & found Section Car 42.  

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Then travels down to Williams where we spent the night had a good night's rest.

 

Thursday March 13th

In the train all-day. Left Williams at 5:30 a.m. and went a lot in past Winston where we transfer mts from our section 2 compartment B which was far more comfortable.

We got to Albuquerque by 5:10 p.m. and got out, Thought magsie and oranges. Mrs. Thomas had a sandwich and left there in the church he had gotten car and Mr. Davis called upon us and dashed if he if I was the lady who had come over from Wales with the a mission. He is from Briton ferry. His wife a pretty woman from Llanelly.

-----

They lived at men's fields a lot worse and tinplate industry town near Cleveland Ohio. Mansfield tinplate company Mr. Davy one of the directors. we had a comfortable night.

Friday March 14th 1924 

After breakfast Mr. And Mrs. Davy called to see us and were very pleasant.  Asked S to stay with them in their home in mannsfield. He spoke much of the great effects of prohibition in this country. Difference between breaking state and federal law. 

 

The men drank before-and supposed it all himself. Now he spends the money on a Ford car this family say of it with him more money saved.  The Workman did not ask for the worst offenders where the people who could buy it the masters and the coast towns gave an instance of Mr White  

Page 49

One of the most prominent men in Mansfield providing whisky at 1 of the clubs.  Found out that although all the wealth of the place was available for his defence,  he was condemned to prison for 3 years.

 

We sat and sewed most of the day went in to see George his mother who lives next door to us. Then we went to call-up on Mr. And Mrs. Davy in their compartment. They invited the and to have dinner with them . On invitation we excepted with the alacrity. Slept bayed this night. Got out for 20 minutes at Kansas.

Saturdsy March 15th 

 

6. Chicago, Niagara Falls & Utica

 

Saturday March 15th

 

Got up early, I had breakfast and packed. Got to Chicago by 10 to 10 got a taxi and drove up to 4933 Lexhampton Avenue where Abbie greeted us very warmly, where we found a bundle of letters awaiting us- 3 from Peter, 4 from Tom, 2 from Lily, 1 from John- and many others. Tidied up and went round to station to secure sections for the trip to Buffalo. $5.63 each-Back to Abbie’s and then had lunch and down to Field Museum by 3pm. Met David there and to a lecture on Egyptian Mummies-

 

Mrs Pearson soon arrived and we went to David’s room and she told me of the Student Fellowship and spoke for an hour- Wanted me to be the sponsor for Wales and gave me brooch and information ie movement etc, etc –

 

We drove back to Dorchester and then had tea, and went out to the Kenwood to dinner at 6.30, walking there and back!

 

Page 50

Got back home and listened to the radio- a terrible Sobotch and it was soon turned off. We sat and talked and read papers- Went to bed and slept well.

 

Sunday March 16th

Got up had breakfast at 10 a.m – then packed up my things and a Mr. Chevey, a friend of David’s, called about his little girls Sally and Betty- we sat and talked, had lunch at 1.30 and left at 2.45 for 53rd Street Station on the Michigan Central RG. David and Abbie drove with us and we left at 3.11 in Car 8- Section 807 for Niagara Falls. A lovely afternoon, and passed along the side of Lake Michigan and thro’ small orchards of peaches and vines and to Kalamazoo where 2/3rds of celery used of[sic] the United States is grown.

7.20 p.m. Just passed through Battle Creek.

A young Belgium girl called Georgette came and spoke to us

 

Monday- March 17th

 

Our kind porter on the train called us before 6.am in a gentle “tap, tap” under our beds and told us we were nearing Niagara. We dressed quickly and hastily and had all our baggage and ourselves in readiness when the train steamed in to Niagra Falls Station, at 6.05. Too dark to see anything of the Falls, as we passed along.

 

We got off the train and went into the station and began wondering what we had better do about getting in touch with Eluned Prys who had arranged to meet us at Buffalo that day. As Buffalo was 23 miles beyond Niagara we decided to get off there and get in touch with Eluned at Lennox Hotel Buffalo – the place arranged for our meeting.  We phoned to the manager 

Page 51

of Lennox Hotel, but she was not there.  We then went to a café the other side of the street from the station and the 3 of us- Mr Thomas, Georgette and myself.  We then sent a long wire to Eluned to Lennox Hotel. We then made arrangements for going round to see the wonders of Niagara Falls.  We started walking through the Park and had our first view of the wonderful Falls.  We saw two rainbows as we saw the Falls. We then arranged to take the Scenic Trip around the Falls and through the Gorge- paying $1.50 for the round trip.

 

We got over the great steel arch bridge to Canada and on to Table Rock- where we got off and went into the stores where there were various things for sale, made of spav and leather and we decided to go down to see the Falls from inside- so we donned oil skins, sou’westers and rubber Napoleons and set forth! Going into an elevator, we went down, down into the bowels of the Earth and came eventually to a spot where we got out and where a tunnel had been cut thro’ the rocks and had several peeks of the Falls from within and behind, so to speak. Large suaubkgs  parts of the water was frozen, and the tunnel was lined and beautifully decorated with icicles- many of them yards long –I tumbled (nothing new) on the ice and slipped have, James, but our valiant escort rescued me and I soon found my feet again.  We retraced our steps and then got back to the top safely- After removing the extra clothing and making some purchases we made our way to the Power House of the Canadian Electrical Plant and were conducted over the whole place and shown everything of interest by a guide. Booklet gives all details of this and of our Scenic Trip. We then continued our trip around and had the most gorgeous views of everything. Setting back at 1.30- we went to the same place for lunch – Louis’s Restaurant.

 

Page 52

No sign of Eluned.

/or played round bought some trifles (and) / (specifically?) post card until 3.42pm when we left by train for Utica.  Leaving Georgette alone on the platform.  We had a pleasant trip by train to Utica: passing through Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, where Miss Carver and her brother in law came to see us pass through. Miss Carver looked well and bonnie and was very cheery and told us the news of Eluned’s engagement to an Austrian Count!!  She told us she intended sailing for home on April 5th.

 

We got to Utica at 9.42, where we were met by Rev T.O. Hughes (slim /con) of one of the Welsh American Churches who was sniffling at Utica –Mr Henry Hughes of the “Utica Press” and Mr Morris Williams secretary of the Cymreigyddion Society. We waited about for a time, hoping to have news of Eluned and  I gave Mr Hughes a short interview and then we went by taxi to the Hotel Utica, where reservations had been made for us by the Welsh friends.

 

Upon reaching the hotel we found several ladies awaiting our arrival- Shy, timid women who gave us a warm welcome, standing in a semi circle and beaming upon us and we were so tired, we just wanted to go to our rooms to rest- we were shown our rooms 605-606. Two rooms and a bathroom- reserved for Eluned and Mr Thomas and me. We had just begun to unpack when two ladies arrived - Mrs Hitchcock, of whom more anon, and Mrs Lloyd, wife of brother in law to Mrs Elvet-Lewis, thro her first husband. The former talked and sputtered the other tried to get in a little remark edgeways, but failed. We were then left in peace and had a good night’s rest.

 

Notes/Thoughts

 

There is still a Field Museum in Chicago, specialising in Egyptian artefacts.  Emailed them on 19/05/19 for additional information.

https://www.fieldmuseum.org/

 

Michigan Central RG line to Niagara Falls

 

Lennox Hotel Buffalo.  Messaged the hotel looking for old photographs from then.

 

7. New York and Homewards

 

Page 53

Tuesday March 18th

Had our breakfast brought up to me & then got dressed by 10.a.m. Had to give an address for this luncheon which was fixed for 12 o’clock. At 11.a.m. Mrs John Evans who had tried to arrange a Welsh tea party called at the Hotel to see me & with her was Mrs Professor (?) _ Evans. After discussing the matter I arranged to meet the Welsh women at 10:30 the following morning at the Welsh Schoolroom. At 12 we went back to the room where luncheon was and where we found a company of 450 to 500 people assembled. Including a large number of men - the lunch had been arranged by the St. Davids’ Womens’ Club & they had invited representatives of the 10 other womens’ clubs in the city & these 10 clubs and representatives at the speakers table. Mrs Hitchcock, pres. of the St Davids’ club presented - I after having a good meal - Mrs Hitchcock spoke & introduced me - then I spoke & then meetings were extended to me from his diff: representatives present - a bouquet of sweet peas was given to Mrs Thomas & me by the President of the _ Women’s Club who spoke of _____ like this.

 

Page 54

Mr Morris Williams & Mrs Parry, Pres. of Cymreig y _ Socials spoke to ours & all acclaimed Wales & us for coming over with such a message & promised to do all they could towards promoting the ideals of World Peace - they also sent greetings & promises & appreciation to the women of Wales. It was a very pleasant gathering - well managed and successfully arranged. We heard echoes of domestic misunderstanding & differences. - We held quite a reception after the luncheon was over until Mrs Hitchcock & a Mrs Hasard captured us & took us for a drive around the Boulevard of _ - then to the Citizen Club - where we listened to the dullest accounts of some places on the Hudson - letters had been written by some people living in this place & were read by women who had no idea of the elements of voice production - then the chair woman called upon me quite unexpectedly to give my message - I did so - then _ _ Mrs Alcock & Miss Butcher & some other ladies as guests of the Citizen Club -

Then I had an hours rest mercifully for I was very tired -

To the Church where the Welsh meeting was to be held - presided over by Mrs _ Williams - Dr Schneider gave greeting son behalf of the Church of the City - & spoke splendidly.

Some sighing. Welsh hymns sung & I gave an account of the memorial & we were presented with an American _ by Mr Pazze, President of the Cymreig _ Soc: & after several other speakers had taken part the meeting terminated.

Nellie Owen knew  a _ Owen in Liverpool. 

Several people came & spoke to us & we had quite a reception.

We then walked back to the hotel with Mrs Hitchcock who took us into a restaurant - for an iced drink.

A peculiar & clever lady this, - full of kindness, _ and ability __.

 

Page 55

than half her time from home - lives 5 miles outside _ - has a husband & a boy in college & a girl training


 

All of Tuesday March 18th is missing, across Pages 53, 54 and 55

 

Page 55

Wednesday

Had breakfast downstairs, packed and ready 10 a.m. when Mrs Hitchcock called and took us and our baggage in a car to see Mrs Thomas, another lady from Ffestiniog who was well up in the affairs of Wales, tho ‘having’ left there many many years ago. A great admirer of Tom. Called her firstborn Tom Ellis, her second William Evans Gladstone, her third  John Morley , and if she had had a 4th he was to be Owen Morgan Evans – very interesting and well read old lady but had got hoed of some mylie about her father and mine starting Aberystwyth College!!

 

From seeing her we went – on to the schoolroom of the Welsh Chapel, where about 50 women had assembled to meet us. Mrs Saw: (Proffs Evans President and she expressed the satisfaction and pleasure of those present re re. I then said a few words – and then Mrs Thomas and I were presented with gifts. I had a silver fruit and flower vase – and Mrs Thomas had a pie slice. We both acknowledged the gifts with much emotion – it was such a surprise; reowing from these women whom we had never known or not before – it was truly unexpected, but very pleasant. That aud ed said 

Page 56

of Lily’s and a maid of Uncle D.C. Davies who gave me a present of a cup and saucer and plate which belonged to lively  and Aunty Davies. Green and white. Not a relative of Tom’s - a Mrs Rees, who gave me a patchwork bag. From there we went under Mrs Louis Williams’ guidance to the station, where we met Mrs Hildcrek and some other ladies.

 

One  section sat on one side of the bench – another section on the other Mrs Hitchcock representing one element.  Mrs John Evans the other and they did not blend. They were all very kind to us, but not quite so understanding towards each other. We left lfca happily after receiving much kindness from the Welsh friends there.

 

We had a very pleasant trip downfrom Ifca to New York – along the banks of the Hudson River – the scenery was quite  Swiss in parts, the snow capped mountains behind and little islands appearing now and again all beautifully green and fresh looking.

 

Arriving at New York, we made our way to the Women’s University Club. I found letters and papers awaiting us – we had dinner at this Club and Miss Chaudor joined us. Then Mrs Thomas and I went to see “Stepping Stones” at the Globe Theatre- Mrs Thomas standing treat. A very enjoyable sunentertainment. Mrs Fred Stone, Mrs Stone and their daughter being the chief actors – enjoyed it thoroughly. Back to club and to bed – had looked at sliined at Y.W.C.A, but as not stheurs of how

 

Thursday March 20th

Eluned arrived in the Club, hold as she had been to Buffalo and Niagara but w fund no news of us. 20 went on to stay with some friends, making no effort to find out where we were in Litrea

 

We went to change money and do a little shopping in the morning – and then returned to the Club. 

Page 57

Eluned and I were invited to lunch at the Colony Club by Mrs Ruth Morgan. We got there by 1.15pm and met Miss Morgan and her mother, had a delicious lunch, and Mrs Morgan spoke of messages which should be sent by women of America to women of Wales in reply to their message. These replies were provided for the Annual Meeting of the Welsh Council of the League of Nations Union – in Whit week. Mrs Morgan brought us back to the Club in a taxi and left us there. Later in the afternoon we three went to Ex. Pres Roosevelt’s first house to sea, the house is now a museum. We were welcomed by Mrs Alexander Laubert who is much interested in the work of the museum. Then Mrs Landthaur arrived and presented to with the the papers, after laying to the aroulughing of the luncheon and the Hospitality Committee re all put up neatly in vellum cases. Them Mrs Lewis the Lirtrarian joined us and we all had together. L Eluned left early to meet Mrs Lidew. Mrs Thomas and I went with Mrs Laidlaur in a taxi to the Club. 

 

We had some telephone calls to see to, including one from Leila Megane, who had decided to get married the following day, and wished me to give her away. We then dressed ourselves in our evening clothes, and sat waiting in the lobby for Miss Chaundor’s arrival. She had promised to take us to the League of Nations Nou Panhsa Dinner at the Baltimore Hotel.

 

Arrived there in good time, and met many old and new friends. I was put to sit at the speakers table between Mr Frank Emerson and Mrs James Neal. After speeches by Mrs vanderslip, Mrs Little and Mr levenmore I was called up to give a 2 mins speech . It was a case of “Play up Wales”.

 

Page 58

Friday March 21st 1924

 

In the morning we went down to White Star Offices and Customs House and got our tickets stamped habels k –

Took a taxi from there to call upon Mr John Fairman – and bid him goodbye and with many grateful thanks for all his kindness to us. From there went up Fifth Avenue to Maurice’s Restaurant 49th Street to meet Megane and her fiancé. They arrived in due time and we had lunch with them. I heard the final arrangements for the wedding.

 

After a very nice lunch, French looking, we four and Mr Schang the best man went in a taxi to the Welsh Chapel 120th Street. Megane dressed in a covent courting costume, light fawn with felt hat to match. Rev Jospeh Evans performed the ceremony in Welsh, and I 

Page 59

gave the bride away. There were a few spectators – including Mr and Mrs Mrs Hughes and Mrs Cobinga bright and her little girl. Mrs Roberts and Mrs Allis on re re.

 

From there, Mr and Mrs Hughes, Mrs Allison, Mrs Thomas and I went as far as Rev D.W. Richards’ house, and I went to see how Mr Richards was – he was in bed, and was not too well. Stayed only a few minutes as they were all waiting for me in the car.

 

We drove back to Mrs Hughes’ house and at 5.30pm the bride and groom arrived and we had a sumptuous dinner. We then all went along to the Welsh Church where a reception had been arranged in our honour – Dr Keigwhi Dr Keigwhi presided the Minister of one of the Presbyterian Churches in New York – Addresses of welcome were delivered by Rev. Josepth Evans on behalf of the Welsh Churches of the city. By ladies representing different societies. By a gentleman kept a Welsh Lodge re re he have saug Y. Nsfoedd a Cartref. Their husband accompanied her. A beautiful bouquet of trees was presented to the by Mrs mrs Hughes who also made a charming speech. A fasw – an oak tree kk.

 

Megane got the flowers meant for Eluned. I spoke for about 25 minutes, giving the message. Mr Bowman a friend of Mr Hughes took Mrs Thomas ride back to the Club in his car – via Broadway all lighted up and brilliant – getting there at midnight.

 

I then started packing and got to bed bet 1.30 or 2am.

 

Page 60 missing 

Saturday March 22 1924

 

Page 61

Sunday March 23rd  1924

Got up and dressed but did not feel well. Stayed in bed all day – could eat nothing -  had lemon water and orange twice to drink.

 

Mr Jones Chief Steward, a native of Llandudno, now of Liverpool, very kind and attentive – Mr and Mrs Elliot the fuser called to see me in the Cabrui – very anxious lodo all to please and make us comfortable. Rather a rough day in ship’s mim.

 

Monday March 24th 1924

I spent the day in bed – no hught for anything bad throat. Wanted no food. Read Recepnaw’s Steps.

 

Step’s mim. 511 rules.

 

Sunday March 25th

First up and on deck by 11:30am. Had lunch and dinner on deck. Mr Jones Chief Steward most kind and attentive.

Lazed and slept and read. Bright and sunny day. Slup’s mum 511 rules.

 

Wednesday March 26th 1924

Got up about 9:30 and have been on deck all day. Bright and sunny day. Had nice lunch of lamb cutlets, that Mr John Davies the ship’s butcher, a member of Webster Rd Chapel, Liverpool, a native of Ruthin.

 

Felt better vbelier, and spent the whole day on deck.

 

Ship’s sewi 513 rules. Boat going very steadily – walie so little movement.

 

Page 62

Thursday March 27th 1924

Went on deck early. Had lunch and dinner up there. Ship going very steadily. Read Jolie Falsworthy’s

Mr John Davies very attentive. Sat up until nearly 10pm had to her night.

Ship’s num 511 rules. A little rusty and wet at night.

 

Friday March 28th 1924

Have sat indoors writing letters most of afternoon. This a.m Mr Jones took us round the ship. The kitchens, store rooms, first class accommodation re. Getting nearer and nearer home: 

 

a diolch nawr am hyny – Rhyfeddol mor dda ni mae Duw wedi bod i ni heb eu hap na ddauwwain. Diolch lddo!

 

Last sentence on page 62 / RH side missing

 

8. Notes (Back of Diary)

 

Page B1

 

Fares 60 10 0

               10 0

         2    10 5

         2    0   0

 

         £70  0  0

 

Tips   5 0  0

???   50   0  0

????   -----------------    

£70     130

           70

         ---------

           £200 

 

Page B2

 

It is the subjective matter that counts not the objective.

It depends what we bring to life.

The secret is inside.

Success and failure, prosperity or ???

ill health, bad health, it will

come to us all.

Carry at the centre of your life

Devotion of Divine in Life

The consciousness of the Love of

God which includes love of Man

That is real Religion

Fosdick as a boy went to pick

a quart of raspberries

he picked 2 quarts and surprised

the family. Redeemed a situation

by changing the inner attitude

If you habitually live like this

win a great prize.

 

at Stanford University

500 women students

1500 men

---

at Berkeley

10000 students

Equal member of each

Society club

 

Page B3

Continuation of Fosdyck’s sermon

 

Every sin has its nemesis

Begins to level up thro the

halls of God grind slowly ??

What diff[erence] can it make what

life I live? Trouble comes to all.

but clean and unclean trouble are

so different. Jesus and Judas died

the same day, but were they alike?

Mothers of Gol[gotha] How different

There are some things we can’t

help having happened to us, but

we can keep our trouble clean.

If we love God, all things work

Together for good.

“To them that love God.

Eccles[iasticus]: takes negative attitude

to Life.

Paul takes positive and creative

to Life.

Divine alchemy that will

transmute lead to gold

Prayer of George Mathesonthe

blind preacher. “O God whether

thou counsel in sunshine or rain” 

 

Page B4

One building stories high

New York a city of heights

Washington a city of beautiful buildings

Chicago a city of lengths

         Michigan Avenue 60 miles long

Utica a city of beautiful boulevards

Salt Lake City a city of Mormons

San Francisco city of hills

Los Angeles city with beautiful

                     suburbs

 

Page B5

I am a broken piece of Machinery

When the machinery is broken

-- the feeble voice trailed off for a

moment then resumed

                                 “I am ready”

With these words on his lips the great

war president passed into the Great

Beyond. Woodrow Wilson had

?????? up on his immortality

 

It is too soon to know his place in history

that decision must be made by

Posterity, the divine Sovereign who

Makes and unmakes the reputation

of the heroic dead.

W[oodrow] W[ilson] was an idealist and gladly

suffered the fate of most idealists

he said

“I would rather fail in a cause I know

some day will triumph than win

in a cause I know some day will fail

 

I want people to love me, said Wilson

once to his Sec[retary] J. P. Tumulty

“but they never will”

Not to have a place in the hearts of

his people was part of the cross he

 

bore – he had their confidence, he won

their admiration but he missed

their love.

 

It was his cause which had triumphed

not Woodrow Wilson

His countrymen they never love him

But can there be any question

that they will revere his memory

rejoice in his achievements?

The world will make a shrine

of his grave.

 

His body is interred in the new

National Cathedral on Mount

St Alban. ?????? which

overlooks the capital in much the

same way that the Temple of Jesus

above overlooks the landscape

?? about it.

The cathedral has not yet been

finished; the apse is completed

where his body lies. If the

founders of this shrine for patriots

of all faiths are to realize their

dream of making it the Westminster Abbey

of America, housing the remains of our

great dead, with W.W. they have well begun

 

For Reference (not in diary) 

Notes: Fosdick story: Attitude is everything

Harry Emerson Fosdick once told how as a child, his mother sent him to pick a quart of raspberries. Reluctantly he dragged himself to the berrypatch. His afternoon was ruined for sure. Then a thought hit him. He would surprise his mother and pick two quarts of raspberries instead of one. Rather than drudgery his work now became a challenge. He enjoyed picking those raspberries so much that fifty years later that incident was still fresh in his mind. The job hadn't changed. His attitude had, though, and attitude is everything.

Dynamic Preaching, June, 1990


















 

References

 


 

[1] Mr Glynne Roberts, from Holyhead, was at this point Assistant to the General Manager of the London Midland & Scottish Railway (following ‘grouping’ in 1923, his role transferred from the London & North Western Railway with Euston station).

[2] Annie’s description of the Saloon Carriage – ‘a drawing room, with easy chairs, tables etc’ - suggests the London Midland & Scottish Railway may have laid on for them a luxury vehicle from the LNWR Royal Train Stock as preserved at the Bluebell, a Directors Saloon or a ‘Club Car’ as preserved in Keighley,

[3] Rhys Hopkyn Morris was Liberal MP for Cardiganshire elected in 1923 General Election; a fierce opponent of Lloyd George, be became (in 1936) the first Director of the BBC in Wales, and in 1951 Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons. Considered the ‘last Liberal Gladstonian’.

[4] Goronwy Owen was Liberal MP for Caernarvonshire elected in 1923 General Election, and a relative of PM David Lloyd George.

[5] Arlington National Cemetery is a national military cemetery across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. It marks the resting place for thousands of veterans, including those that fought in the American Civil War (hence Annie’s reference to “the war for the Union”.

[6] The Lincoln Memorial is a famous marble memorial to the 16th US President, the “Savior of the Union”. It is located in the National Mall in Washington and was the site of a number of important moments in the Civil Rights movement.

[7] The Washington National Cathedral is the second largest cathedral in the US and, as Annie notes, was still being built in 1924 (it was not fully completed until 1990). Woodrow Wilson, the 28th President, had died only 18 days before this diary entry was written.

[8] Radcliffe College was established in 1879 and finally merged with Harvard College in 1999, becoming the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

[9] Robert M. La Follette was a Wisconsin Senator from 1906 to 1925. A Republican for much of his career, he established the Progressive Party in 1924 as a vehicle to run for President in that year’s election. The party advocated a number of progressive positions, including government ownership of utilities, stronger labour laws and better protection of civil liberties. La Follette achieved 3rd place with 16.6% of the vote.

[10] Washington’s Birthday is a national holiday in honour of the first President, celebrated each year in mid-February. The “cherry favour” reference that follows may relate to cherry pie, a food traditionally associated with the holiday.

[11] This may be the Memorial Continental Hall, national headquarters of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

[12] The Council was founded in 1921 by representatives of 17 peace organisations, originally as the National Council for Limitation of Armaments. It continued to gain support in the run-up to the Second World War, in which it opposed US involvement. The Council continued until 1954.

[13] The Permanent Court was the court of the League of Nations. It existed from 1920 to 1946, when it was replaced by the United Nations’ International Court of Justice.

[14] The Blackstone Hotel opened in 1910 and is still in existence today. It is known as the ”Hotel of Presidents”, due to its history of hosting heads of state.

[15] Englewood Station was in the South Side of Chicago, and at one time was one of the city’s most important stations, standing at a junction of three railroads. It closed in the late 1970s. South Dorchester Avenue is approximately 2 miles away in the South Shore area.

[16] The University Club of Chicago was founded in 1887 by representatives of several universities. It fosters appreciation of literature and the arts.

[17] A former Chicago department store.

[18] A renowned Biblical epic directed by Cecil B. DeMille, The Ten Commandments was released in 1923.

[19] Possibly Charles E. Merriam, a political scientist noted for his progressive views.

[20] Dr. Agnes Wells chaired several state and national associations for women’s education. She was also an advocate for equal political rights and at one time chaired the National Women’s Party.

[21] Probably Adele Schreiber-Krieger, who sat in the Reichstag (German parliament) for the Social Democratic Party of Germany between 1920–1924 and 1928–1932. She was a noted feminist and activist for the rights of women and children.

[22] The South Wales Daily News was “one of the chief organs of Welsh Liberal politics”. An associated title, South Wales News, was published from 1918 to 1928.

[23] The largest public park in Chicago, Lincoln Park is situated along Lake Michigan and is well known for its statues of Grant, Lincoln and others.

[24] Now demolished, the Kenwood Hotel stood on the junction of East 47th Street and Kenwood Avenue.

[25] This might be Y Brython – a weekly bilingual newspaper, established in 1906 by Hugh Evans. A weekly paper with a closer name, Ye Brython Cymreig, appears to have gone out of print before 1924.

[26] A romantic novel published in 1922.

[27] Located in Green River, Utah, this station was originally built by the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad.

[28] The Canyon Lands are a desolate sandstone region of the Colorado Plateau, covering an area south-east Utah and north-east Arizona.

[29] The Morgan City station was first built in the 1890s, forming a stop along the Union Pacific Railroad. It closed in 1977.

[30] Part of the Wasatch Range, Ogden Canyon and the nearby city of Ogden are named after Peter Skene Ogden, a 19th century Canadian fur trader and explorer.

[31] The Travelers Aid movement began in 1851, originally to assist women and girls travelling westwards within the United States. In the UK, the similar Travellers’ Aid Society was closely associated with the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA).

 

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