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Welsh National Garden of Peace Time Capsule, buried 1988

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Temple of Peace Time Capsule

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Founded in 1988 by United Nations Association (UNA) Trustee Robert Davies – an International Youth Service (IYS) volunteer since the 1950s – Wales’ National Garden of Peace was created by a series of international exchange youth work camps to celebrate the values of the Temple of Peace & Health, and to mark the 50th anniversary of the opening of the building.

The Peace Garden had first been part of Lord David Davies’ original vision for the Temple of Peace, conceptualised within the designs of the Temple’s Architect, Sir Percy Thomas, in 1929. The garden was intended as a place of contemplation within the Civic Centre of Cathays Park, where the public could enjoy a beautiful space dedicated to, and inspired by, Wales’ peace makers.

However, the outbreak of WW2 shortly after construction and opening of the Temple of Peace itself (in 1938) brought a halt to works; and following WW2, energies focused on supporting establishment of the United Nations. The space remained open lawns until the 50th anniversary of the Temple – when founders of UNA Exchange took on the challenge of realising Lord Davies’ founding vision for the Peace Garden.

International volunteers from all over the world (including 1 from Russia, then still in the Cold War) dug out and landscaped the space, planted the first trees, and – around a central flagpole – laid a mosaic designed around the UN blue laurel and dedicated to the ideals of the United Nations.

Three flagpoles fly the flags of the Wales, the United Nations, and alternately the Peace flag (rainbow), European and / or other international institutions or campaigns with which theTemple was founded to promote Welsh engagement.

 



Irene Chamberlain (93) and Richard Mears (8) open the Peace Garden in 1988.


The Peace Garden was formally opened in November 1988 by 93-year old Irene Chamberlain, who had been one of the women at the opening ceremony of 1938, alongside 8 year old Richard Mears from Cathays Primary School, the youngest member of UNA. Together they buried a Time Capsule of objects to be dug up

Today, the Peace Garden remains a space where the contribution of the people of Wales to peace and social justice can be remembered. Many trees and shrubs have been planted in memory of special people, movements or events, identified by commemorative plaques and monuments, as well as memorial stones, commemorative benches and pieces of art. By 2020, over 50 memorials remember some of Wales’ most inspiring peacemakers.for the Temple’s 100th anniversary in 2038 (a record of which is in the Temple Archives).

More at: https://www.wcia.org.uk/national-garden-of-peace/




Irene Chamberlain (93) and Richard Mears (8) open the Peace Garden in 1988.


The Peace Garden was formally opened in November 1988 by 93-year old Irene Chamberlain, who had been one of the women at the opening ceremony of 1938, alongside 8 year old Richard Mears from Cathays Primary School, the youngest member of UNA. Together they buried a Time Capsule of objects to be dug up for the Temple’s 100th anniversary in 2038 (a record of which is in the Temple Archives).

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